Experts
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Sarah Little, MD MPH is a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She graduated from Harvard College with a degree in economics, attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco and completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Brigham and Women’s/Massachusetts General Hospital and her fellowship in Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She has a Master’s in Public Health in clinical effectiveness from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Little joined the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 2014. Dr. Little’s research focuses on obstetric quality and outcomes in the U.S. Recent projects have investigated the association between provider volume and mode of delivery and the geographic variation in cesarean delivery rates across the U.S. She is particularly interested in cesarean delivery variation, labor induction practices, and policies and outcomes following a trial of labor after cesarean delivery.
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Patient Safety
    • Professor and Director of Obstetrics at Weill Medical College of Cornell University
    Amos Grünebaum, MD is an active Obstetrician and Gynecologist, a specialist in Maternal-Fetal Medicine, a Professor at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and the Director of Obstetrics and the Chief of Labor and Delivery at NewYork-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York. Professor Dr. Grünebaum’s main interest has been improving patient safety in Obstetrics. His most recent focus has been patient safety and outcomes at home births. Dr. Grünebaum has authored or co-authored over 40 peer-reviewed articles as well as multiple book chapters. He has consistently been named as a New York Top Doctor by Castle Connelly, and a best Doctor in New York and America and is very active on social media.
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Director - UCL Institute for Women's Health and Co-Director Policy Research Unit – Maternal Health and Care, University of Oxford
    Director - UCL Institute for Women's Health and Co-Director Policy Research Unit – Maternal Health and Care, University of Oxford
    • Professor of Women’s Health at UCL EGA Institute for Women's Health
    Director of the Institute for Women’s Health at UCL, Co-Director of the Department of Health Policy Research Unit in Maternal Health and Care, University of Oxford, and Director of the UCL Comprehensive Clinical Trials Unit. Graduated in Medicine from Dundee University in 1985. After post-graduate training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology he was admitted to the RCOG in 1991. He was awarded an MSc in Epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 1994, and then joined the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit as a research fellow in perinatal trials, becoming a consultant clinical epidemiologist and then Director. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health, and Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. Currently leads a programme of clinical trials and epidemiological studies in perinatal care. Chairs numerous steering committees and data monitoring committees. In 2010 he was made a National Institute for Health Research Senior Investigator. Other national roles: Chair of UK Medical Research Council Methodology Research Programme panel. Chair of National Institute for Health Research Maternal, Neonatal and Child Health panel.
    • Family Medicine
    • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    • Pediatrics
    • Primary Care
    • Maternity Care
    • Pediatrics
    Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics and Family Practice, University of British Columbia
    Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics and Family Practice, University of British Columbia
    • Professor Emeritus of Family Practice and Paediatrics at University of British Columbia
    Michael C. Klein , M.D., C.C.F.P., F.C.F.P., F.A.A.P. (Neonatal/Perinatal), F.C.P.S., is Emeritus Professor of Family Practice and Paediatrics at UBC, Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine McGill University, and Senior Scientist Emeritus at The Child and Family Research Institute in Vancouver. A graduate of Oberlin College and the Stanford University School of Medicine and certified in the US and Canada in Paediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine and Family Medicine, he is best known as PI for the only North American RCT of episiotomy, demonstrating that it caused the very trauma that it was supposed to prevent, which is credited with contributing to a large drop in routine episiotomy use and a concurrent fall in rectal trauma. He has been an investigator on the British Columbia studies of home birth, demonstrating the safety of home birth in an integrated, regulated system of care. He is the PI on a Canadian National Study of the attitudes and beliefs of all maternity care providers and the women they serve. He was head of The Herzl Family Practice Centre and Department of Family Medicine at the Jewish General Hospital, a unit of the McGill Department of Family Medicine, for 17 years and Head of the Department of Family Practice at Children’s and Women’s in Vancouver for 10 years and the Founder and Executive and Medical Director of Westside Health Services in Rochester New York for 5 years. He has received The Morris Wood Award for Lifetime Contributions to Primary Care Research from the North American Primary Care Research Group, Family Physician Researcher of the Year from the College of Family Physicians of Canada, The Founders Award from the international Doula organization, DONA, the annual research Award from Lamaze International and The Award for Lifetime Contributions to Family Practice Research from the College of Family Physicians of Canada and was named in 2015 as one of the Top 20 Researchers in Family Practice over the past 30 years, also by the College of Family Physicians of Canada . Dr. Klein has practiced medicine in Canada before national health insurance, in the United States without national health insurance and in Canada with national health insurance. He and his wife Bonnie, a Filmmaker/Director, at the National Film Board of Canada, emigrated from the US to Canada in 1967 because he refused to be a military physician during the Vietnam War. They raised their children, Seth and Naomi in Montreal, and now live in Vancouver and the nearby Sunshine Coast in British Columbia.
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Physician & Social Entrepreneur, Executive Director of Costs of Care
    Physician & Social Entrepreneur, Executive Director of Costs of Care
    • Faculty Investigator at Ariadne Labs
    Dr. Neel Shah, MD, MPP is the Founder and Executive Director of Costs of Care, a nationally recognized nonprofit that helps caregivers deflate medical bills. He has been listed among the "40 smartest people in health care" by the Becker's Hospital Review, and profiled in the New York Times, the New England Journal of Medicine, and other outlets for his efforts to expose how low value care can cause financial harm to patients. In addition, he is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School and a faculty investigator at the Ariadne Labs for Health Systems Innovation, where he studies the impact of system complexity on discretionary clinical decisions. As an obstetrician-gynecologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Dr. Shah cares for patients from childbirth through menopause and practices both primary care and surgery. Dr. Shah completed residency at Brigham & Women's Hospital and received degrees in medicine and public policy from Brown Medical School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He is a co-author of the textbook, Understanding Value-Based Care expected from McGraw-Hill in early 2015.
    • Quality Improvement
    • Health Policy
    Maternal health services researcher; Health policy analyst; Associate Professor University of Minnesota School of Public Health
    Maternal health services researcher; Health policy analyst; Associate Professor University of Minnesota School of Public Health
    • Associate Professor, Division of Health Policy and Management at University of Minnesota School of Public Health
    KATY B. KOZHIMANNIL, PHD, MPA is an Associate Professor in the Division of Health Policy and Management at the University of Minnesota, and an investigator at the University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center. Her research applies the tools of health policy and health services research to the field of women’s health, with a focus on maternal and child health. Dr. Kozhimannil earned her masters degree in public policy at Princeton University and holds a PhD in health policy from Harvard University. She completed postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Kozhimannil conducts research to inform the development, implementation, and evaluation of health policy that impacts health care delivery, quality, and outcomes during the perinatal period. The goal of her scholarly work is to contribute to the evidence base for clinical and policy strategies to improve maternal and child health and wellbeing and to collaborate with stakeholders in making policy change to facilitate improved health for women and their families. Dr. Kozhimannil’s research, published in major journals such as JAMA, Science, Health Affairs, American Journal of Public Health, Medical Care, and the American Journal of Managed Care, has been widely cited in the bourgeoning academic literature on perinatal care quality improvement. Media coverage of her research, including feature stories by the New York Times, Washington Post, National Public Radio, Wall Street Journal, US News & World Report, and the Huffington Post, has generated dialogue, interest and policy action at local, state, and national levels. In addition to conducting research, Dr. Kozhimannil teaches courses that build skills for effective engagement in the policy process, and works extensively with community organizations and state and federal policy makers on efforts to improve the health and well-being of individuals, families, and communities, starting at birth.
  • Jennifer Hollowell is a senior epidemiologist and Associate Professor in The National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU). She has a PhD in Epidemiology/Health Services Research (St George’s Hospital Medical School, University of London), a first degree in mathematics (University of Oxford), and training in statistics and health economic evaluation. Her research interests include maternal health/intrapartum care and inequalities in infant mortality. She was lead researcher for the Birthplace national prospective cohort study which evaluated the safety of planned birth at home or in a midwifery unit, compared with planned birth in an obstetric unit. This landmark study of nearly 80,000 births has informed major changes to clinical guidelines for planned place of birth for women at low risk of complications. She is currently leading a follow-on programme of Birthplace related research. She is also involved in the Maternity and Women’s Health theme of the South London Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). Her research on inequalities in infant mortality is currently focusing on ethnic variations in infant mortality and other birth outcomes. In addition to academic research, Jennifer has worked as an epidemiologist and health economist in the pharmaceutical industry, and was Research Manager for the General Practice Research Database (GPRD, now CPRD) at the Office for National Statistics.
    • Associate Professor at VU University Medical Center
    Ank de Jonge is a midwife and associate professor.She is the coordinator of the Department of Midwifery Science, AVAG/ EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU university medical center, Amsterdam. Research topics Organisation of care (place of birth, risk selection, integration of care), quality of midwifery care (birthing positions), optimal use of diagnostic tools (ulrasound), reduction of avoidable medical interventions (caesarean section). Short biography I qualified as a nurse in the Netherlands in 1989 and as a midwife in East Anglia, U.K. in 1994. From 1995 to 1998 I worked as a community midwife and midwife tutor in Nigeria. I did a Master in Public Health in Edinburgh from 1998-2000, while I worked as a midwife in Edinburgh and Livingstone. Since 2000, I have been working as a primary care midwife in the Netherlands. From 2003 to 2006 I worked at the Dutch Organisation of Midwives (KNOV) at the department of guideline development. In 2003 I also started a PhD programme at the section Women Studies Medicine, Department of General Practice in Nijmegen. From 2006 to 2009 I worked as a midwife researcher at TNO Institute for Applied Research in Leiden. Since 1 May 2009 I work at the Department of Midwifery Science. PhD thesis “Birthing positions revisited. Examining the evidence for a routine practice.” (2008) UMC St Radboud, Nijmegen.
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Clinical Vice Chair at The Commission for the Accreditation of Birth Centers
    Susan Stapleton, CNM, DNP, FACNM is a graduate of Frontier’s post-master’s Doctor of Nursing Practice program Class 1 Prior to, she had long been involved as faculty and education coordinator in the early years of the pilot Community-Based Nurse-Midwifery Education Program, and as a clinical preceptor for many nurse-midwifery students. Dr. Stapleton founded Reading Birth & Women’s Center in Pennsylvania and directed this private nurse-midwifery practice for 25 years, attending births in the birth center, the mothers’ homes and several area hospitals. She also established a second hospital-based practice in the community. Dr. Stapleton has been actively involved in midwifery, and particularly in birth centers, at the national level for most of her career. She has served on the board of directors of the National Association of Childbearing centers (now the American Association of Birth Centers) and the American College of Nurse-Midwives. She serves as Chair of the AABC Research committee, was instrumental in the development of the AABC online Perinatal Data Registry and has been a strong advocate of the importance of ongoing data collection for birth centers and midwifery. Dr. Stapleton was primary investigator for the 2013 multicenter National Birth Center Study II of 17,000 women planning birth in a birth center at the onset of labor.
  • Virgil G. Damon Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University, NY
    Virgil G. Damon Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University, NY

    Dr. Ananth’s research interests fall under three broad areas: perinatal and reproductive epidemiology; molecular approaches to studying obstetrical complications and adverse perinatal outcomes; and development and applications of innovative statistical approaches to studies in human reproduction. Much of his recent work in perinatal epidemiology has focused on ischemic placental disease (preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction and placental abruption) and preterm delivery. Dr. Ananth has published over 45 research articles on placental abruption, exploring its etiology and its effects on outcomes of pregnancy. In the area of statistical methods, his recent interests include bivariate logistic regression models, and regression models for the analysis of correlated binary and ordinal responses. An impassioned teacher, Dr. Ananth teaches “Principles of Epidemiology and Biostatistics” to residents and fellows in obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University. Dr. Ananth is also a very prolific writer. Since 1996, he has published over 400 research papers in leading scientific peer-reviewed journals, has authored over 20 book chapters, and has presented his research at over 200 scientific conferences.

    In 2010, Dr. Ananth is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology. He has received several prestigious awards, including the “2001 Outstanding Young Professional Award” conferred by the national coalition for excellence in Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology and 13 national health organizations. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology—the only specialty journal that caters to the fields of pediatric and perinatal epidemiology. In addition, he also serves as the chief statistical editor of the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    • Policy Officer at Royal Dutch Organisation of Midwives
    Dr. Pien Offerhaus registered as a midwife in the Netherlands in 1985 after which she spent the first ten years as an independent community midwife. She is the author of several national midwifery guidelines as part of midwifery guideline & research team of the Dutch Organisation of Midwives (KNOV). She completed her PhD in 2015 at the Radboud University, Nijmegen. For her doctoral thesis she investigated trends and practice variation in primary midwifery care. Her main motivation for her work is to improve the evidence basis for midwives in order to contribute to optimal care for pregnant women and their infants.
    • maternity care
    • Midwifery
    Faculty in Nursing, Women's Studies and Midwife in OB/GYN Department at University of Michigan
    Faculty in Nursing, Women's Studies and Midwife in OB/GYN Department at University of Michigan
    • Associate Dean for Practice and Professional Graduate Studies, School of Nursing at University of MIchigan
    Dr. Kane Low focuses her research on advancing evidence based care practices during childbirth that promote optimal outcomes for childbearing women and their families. She conducts clinical research aimed at answering significant questions about the ways in which women can best be cared for during the process of normal birth particularly during second stage labor to prevent pelvic floor injury. Currently, Dr. Low is involved in a number of NIH-funded and internally grant supported studies focusing on the process of care during childbirth including: Clinical and Non-Clinical Factors Influencing the use of Electronic Fetal Monitoring, the SCOR Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Women’s Pelvic Floor Health During Childbirth directed by Dr. John De Lancey, Promoting Optimal Outcomes to Prevent Prolapse with Dr. Dee Fenner, Defining Events during Second Stage Labor and a series of prevention and treatment of projects focused on incontinence in childbearing and older age women. Dr Low has extensive experience working with multi-stakeholder groups to develop and implement model practice and national guidelines focused on the provision of maternity care. She has chaired the Division of Standards and Practice for the American College of Nurse Midwives where she oversaw development of key midwifery practice guidelines and is the incoming President-Elect of ACNM. She also works as a certified nurse midwife in the University of Michigan Health System.
    • Preventive Medicine
    Maternal and child health epidemiologist at OHSU
    Maternal and child health epidemiologist at OHSU
    • Maternal and Child Health Epidemiologist at Oregon Health and Science University
    Kenneth D. Rosenberg, MD, MPH, is Affiliate Assistant Professor at the Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University School of Public Health and is a consultant on maternal and child health epidemiology and policy. He was the maternal and child health epidemiologist for the Oregon Public Health Division, 1997-2015 where he was the Director of the Oregon PRAMS survey (of postpartum women) and PRAMS-2 (the follow-back survey that re-interviews respondents when their child is 2 years old). His work includes breastfeeding support, screening for perinatal depression, SIDS prevention, and folic acid prevention of birth defects. Before coming to the Oregon Public Health Division, he was the Director of Epidemiology and Research, Bureau of Maternity Services and Family Planning, New York City Department of Health. Dr. Rosenberg's undergraduate degree is from Dartmouth College; his medical degree is from Tufts University; his public health degree is from Columbia University and his epidemiology training is from Yale University.
  • Deputy Editor, Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health; Senior Editor, “Varney’s Midwifery”
    Deputy Editor, Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health; Senior Editor, “Varney’s Midwifery”
    • Clinical Health Sciences Professor, School of Nursing at University of California, San Francisco
    Tekoa L.King CNM, MPH, FACNM is Deputy Editor of the Journal of Midwifery & Women¹s Health and Clinical Professor of Health Sciences at the School of Nursing at University of California San Francisco. She was recently a member of the American College of Nurse-Midwives Task Force on Home Birth. Ms. King is the senior editor for the latest edition of Varney¹s Midwifery and the co-author of Pharmacology for Women¹s Health. She teaches fetal heart rate monitoring for the Perinatal Outreach Department at UCSF and is the co-director of UCSF¹s annual Antepartum Intrapartum Management conference.