Experts
    • Medical Biochemical Genetics
    • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    • Pediatrics
    • Medical Genetics
    • Languages: Finnish (native), English (fluent), Spanish (fluent), Swedish (relatively fluent), French (basics)
    Pediatrician, Neonatal (NICU) hospitalist, Medical Biochemical Geneticist, Clinical Geneticist, Co-Director of Pediatric Integrative Medicine (PIM) Residency program, Stanford Children's Hospital & Stanford University, California, USA
    Pediatrician, Neonatal (NICU) hospitalist, Medical Biochemical Geneticist, Clinical Geneticist, Co-Director of Pediatric...
    Annakaisa Niemi, MD, PhD, is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Neonatology (primary), General Pediatrics and Medical Genetics at Stanford University. She is also a Co-Director of Pediatric Integrative Medicine (PIM) Residency program, a member of the Pediatric Integrative Medicine (IM) Core Group at Stanford Children's, and an Editor of the Metabolic Genetic chapters at PEMSoft/EBSCO. Dr. Niemi is the past Recipient of the Genzyme/ACMGF Clinical Genetics Fellowship in Biochemical Genetics Award (award period 7/2011-6/2012) and of the United Mitochondrial Diseases Foundation (UMDF) Clinical Fellowship Award (award period 8/2013-8/2014). Dr. Niemi's PhD thesis was on the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in longevity and elite athletic performance. She has a special interest in Medical Biochemical Genetics, Medical Genetics, Pediatrics, Neonatology and Newborn Care, Integrative Medicine, Organ Transplants for Inborn Errors of Metabolism, and Palliative Care. Additionally, Dr. Niemi is active in blogging & writing (Facebook: Dr. AnnaKaisa, Twitter: @DrAnnakaisa). She has a special passion for creativity in science, medical education, making science & medicine understandable to everyone, children's & human rights, sustainability, and nature & outdoors.
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Medical Genetics
    Professor & Chief Maternal-Fetal Medicine Medicine, UF ObGyn
    Professor & Chief Maternal-Fetal Medicine Medicine, UF ObGyn
    Dr. Tony Gregg joined the University of Florida Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology as Professor, and Chief, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine in June 2011. He is the Director of Obstetrics for UF Health. He also serves as Director of the UF Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellowship Training Program. He received formal medical training at Loyola University and Loyola Foster McGaw Hospital (medical school and residency), the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (maternal fetal medicine) and Baylor College of Medicine (medical genetics). Tony is certified by the American Board of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics. He is certified to practice in general obstetrics and gynecology, maternal fetal medicine and medical genetics. His motivation towards genetics training was to better understand maternal medical complications of pregnancy, to this end he pursued mouse modeling of preeclampsia. He has had research funding by private organizations and foundations as well as small NIH awards. He has held a six year positions as the treasurer of the Perinatal Research Society and as a member of the Board of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). He is a past Chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Genetics and he is currently a liaison to this Committee for the ACMG. He is interested in the implementation of next generation sequencing technology into prenatal care. His focus is technology aimed at detecting chromosome abnormalities (NIPS) and expanded carrier screening.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    Assist. Prof. Clinical Medicine, Human & Molecular Genetics, Nationwide Children's Hospital
    Assist. Prof. Clinical Medicine, Human & Molecular Genetics, Nationwide Children's Hospital
    Dr. Murugu Manickam received his Bachelor of Arts (with honors) from Case Western Reserve University and his Medical Degree from The Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin, Ireland (with honors). He completed an Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency in at MetroHealth Hospital (Case Western School of Medicine) and a Clinical Genetics residency at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Manickam is a Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine (2007) and the American Board of Medical Genetics (2009). He has nearly completed a Masters of Public Health in Public Health Leadership from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Dr. Manickam was a visiting scholar/externship with NHGRI and was selected for a NIH training program in Comparative Effectiveness Research through the Ohio State School of Public Health. Dr. Manickam is currently an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Human and Molecular Genetics (Department of Pediatrics) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. He also has a joint appointment in the Division of Human Genetics in the Department of Internal Medicine at The Ohio State University and the James Cancer Hospital. At Nationwide Children’s Hospital Dr. Manickam provides clinical genetic services with the Genetics Center, as well as in several outreach clinics. At the Ohio State University he is involved in the Medical Genetics Program, Adult Down syndrome Clinic. He also works closely with Nisonger Center in developing adults with disabilities programs. In addition to developing and directing a P4 Medicine Summer Intensive course for 2nd year medical students, he is a member of the College of Medicine’s curriculum development team. Dr. Manickam is a co-PI for the OSU/Coriell Institute collaborative Personalized Medicine study and authored several articles in the area of genomics. He is a member of the Pharmacogenomics Research Network, EPIC genomics working group and the CDC Working Group on Family History/Electronic Medical Record.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Professor of Genetics and Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill
    Professor of Genetics and Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill
    James P. Evans, MD, PhD, is the Bryson Distinguished Professor of Genetics and Medicine at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He directs Adult and Cancer Genetics Services and is clinically active in both Medical Genetics and General Medicine. After obtaining his MD and PhD from the University of Kansas he served as Intern, Resident and Chief Resident of Internal Medicine at The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and then trained in Medical Genetics at The University of Washington in Seattle. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Medical Genetics and in Molecular Diagnostics. Dr. Evans's research interests focus primarily on the applications of next generation genomic analytic technologies in Medicine and broad issues of how genetic information is used and perceived. He has been extensively involved in policy issues both nationally and internationally. He was an advisor to the US Secretary of Health and Human Services on the subject of “Genetics, Health and Society” from 2004-2010 and has been actively involved both nationally and around the world in the education of high court judges about Genetics and scientific matters as described in the New York Times in July of 2008. In 2010 Dr. Evans testified before the US Congress regarding the regulation of genetic testing and has advised the Government Accountability Office on the same subject. In 2011 he was asked to address the US Presidential Commission on Bioethics regarding genetic testing. He has participated in numerous briefings of members of the US Congress regarding matters related to Genetics and participated as faculty and organizer of a United Nations Conference in Concepción, Chile regarding global access to advanced medical technology. Dr. Evans lives in Chapel Hill; he enjoys reading and bicycle riding in his spare time, though not simultaneously.
    • Cardiovascular Disease
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Molecular Genetics
    Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    • Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    Klaus Lindpaintner, MD, MPH, FACP serves as Chief Scientific Officer at Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world's leading provider of analytical instruments, reagents, and services, where he is spearheading efforts to drive innovation with regard to both content and process. Previously, he held senior positions at Hoffman-La Roche, where he spearheaded the company's efforts in personalized health care and was responsible for the respective activities in translational research that have rebranded the company's image; at SDIX, a specialty-antibody-focused biotechnology company; and on the faculty of Harvard Medical School. Klaus has co-authored more than 250 scientific papers, and holds honorary and adjunct professorships at several academic institutions. He serves on numerous boards, working groups, and advisory panels for trade organizations, regulatory authorities, and non-governmental organizations on issues related to the successful implementation and leverage of novel technologies in health care and industrial applications, as well as on the ethical and societal impact of these technologies. Klaus graduated from Innsbruck University Medical School with a degree in medicine, and from Harvard University with a degree in public health. He pursued post-graduate training and specialization in internal medicine, cardiology, and clinical and molecular genetics in the US and Germany, and is a Diplomate of the Boards in these specialties.
    • Otolaryngology
    • Quality Improvement
    • Technology, Innovation and Education
    • Endoscopic and skull-base surgery
    • Allergy management and treatment
    • Clinical outcomes research
    Medical & Scientific Advisory Board Member of Global Genes
    Medical & Scientific Advisory Board Member of Global Genes
    • Physician/Surgeon at Cambridge Hospital, Harvard Medical School
    Ayesha is a Board Certified ENT surgeon with over 10 years of experience in the healthcare industry. She recently completed her MBA at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the Sloan Fellows Program - a program focused on innovation and global leadership. Ayesha is a systems thinker and a healthcare innovation enthusiast. While at Sloan, Ayesha joined MIT H@cking Medicine to help promote disruptive thinking in healthcare. Prior to Sloan, Ayesha served on several Boards for medical organizations, performed cutting edge basic science and clinical research in the areas of inflammation and mucociliary clearance. She is a Medical & Scientific Board Member of Global Genes. As a practicing clinician, understands the healthcare change process and the need to foster cross-disciplinary engagement. She is involved with an innovative venture -Collective Healthtech - that is innovating the way hospitals collaborate on a global level. Ayesha is deeply committed to her passion of promoting girls to study scientific fields as well as technology and engineering. During her time at MIT, she engaged in several educational technology initiatives including a project in Peter Senge's Leadership Lab at MIT Sloan. Through this, she was part of a project at Porto Seguro School in Sao Paulo, Brazil that worked on the integration of technology in education using a systems thinking approach to encourage student-centered learning. @ayeshakhalidmd @mithackmed
    • Neurology
    • Medical Genetics
    Director, G2P Research Program
    Director, G2P Research Program
    Robert C. Green, MD, MPH is a medical geneticist and physician-scientist who directs the G2P Research Program (genomes2people.org) in translational genomics and health outcomes in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Green is internationally recognized for designing and conducting empirical studies in genomic medicine. He led the first experimental trials disclosing common complex disease risk (the REVEAL Study), one of the first prospective studies of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services (the PGen Study) and was lead author on influential recommendations for incidental findings in clinical sequencing from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. He currently leads and co-leads the MedSeq Project and the BabySeq Project, respectively, two NIH-funded randomized trials designed to explore the medical, behavioral and economic implications of integrating genome sequencing into the medical care of adults and newborns. Dr. Green graduated from Amherst College and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, and earned a Masters of Public Health in epidemiology from Emory University School of Public Health. He obtained clinical specialty training at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in both neurology and medical genetics. He has been continuously funded by NIH for over 26 years and has published over 300 scientific articles. He is currently Associate Director for Research of Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine and a Board Member of the Council for Responsible Genetics. Key scientific contributions include publication of the first randomized trials to assess the impact of common complex genetic risk markers, empirical studies describing the medical and behavioral outcomes of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and design of a single page summary for reporting whole genome sequencing to physicians. Dr. Green teaches medical students and mentors post-doctoral trainees and junior faculty in the clinical and research aspects of genomic medicine. Keynote and plenary presentations include the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor, World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Human Genome Variation Society, European Society for Human Genetics, the Forbes Healthcare Summit and the World Science Festival. His work has been featured on PBS radio and television documentaries, NBC Nightly News, the Today Show, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Time Magazine, Fast Company and other national media.
    • Pediatrics
    • Medical Genetics
    President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics
    President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics
    Dr. Gail Herman, MD, PhD is a member of the Center for Molecular and Human Genetics in the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Research Institute and Dept of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Dr. Herman received her medical degree and a doctorate in biochemistry from Duke University. She then did training in Pediatrics and a fellowship in genetics at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. She is board certified as a clinical and biochemical geneticist and is the current President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Her research focuses on molecular basis of selected development disorders, including X-linked disorders of cholesterol synthesis and autism.
    • Clinical Biochemical Genetics
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Ass. Professor of Pediatrics, Div. Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Columbia University
    Ass. Professor of Pediatrics, Div. Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Columbia University
    • Attending Div. Clin. Genetics; Ass. Prof. Pediatrics at Columbia University in the City of New York
    Uta Lichter-Konecki, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Clinical Genetics in the Department of Pediatrics at Columbia University. Dr. Lichter-Konecki specializes in inborn errors of metabolism/inherited metabolic disease, PKU/hyperphenylalaninemia and urea cycle disorders, newborn screening follow-up, and genetic and genomic medicine. Dr. Lichte-Konecki's main interest has is the pathophysiology of the brain damage that occurs in many patients with inborn errors of metabolism especially urea cycle disorders and phenylketonuria and developing neuroprotective therapies for these conditions. Other research interests are renal Fanconi syndrome and lysosomal membrane proteins. Dr. Lichter-Konecki has initiated a study regarding the efficacy of hypothermia treatment in hyperammonemic encephalopathy. She has published over 70 peer reviewed articles and chapters. Dr. Lichter-Konecki is a member of the Therapeutics Committee of the American College of Medical Genetics and is a member of the Scientified Advisory Board of the National PKU Alliance.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    • Pediatrics - Child Neurology
    Chair, Department of Genetic, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Chair, Department of Genetic, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD, is the Wayne H. and Sara Crews Finley Chair in Medical Genetics, Professor and Chair of the Department of Genetics, Director of the Heflin Center for Genomic Sciences at UAB, and Co-Director of the UAB-Hudson Alpha Center for Genomic Medicine. He is a medical geneticist, pediatrician, and child neurologist, certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics (clinical genetics, clinical cytogenetics, clinical molecular genetics), American Board of Pediatrics, and American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (child neurology). Dr. Korf is the past president of the Association of Professors of Human and Medical Genetics, past president of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, and current president of the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine. He has served on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute at the NIH. His major research interests are molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders and the natural history, genetics, and treatment of neurofibromatosis. He serves as principal investigator of the Department of Defense funded Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium. He is co-author of Human Genetics and Genomics (medical student textbook, now in fourth edition), Medical Genetics at a Glance (medical student textbook, now in third edition), Emery and Rimoin’s Principles and Practice of Medical Genetics (now in 6th edition), and Current Protocols in Human Genetics.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Director, Adult Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Medicine, UC-Denver
    Director, Adult Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Medicine, UC-Denver
    Matthew Taylor MD, PhD received his undergraduate degree in Genetics from the University of California at Berkeley. After completing medical school at the University of Southern California, he moved to Colorado and completed residency training programs in Internal Medicine and Clinical Genetics. In 2001, he joined the University of Colorado Denver faculty in the Department of Internal Medicine, where he is currently an Associate Professor. In 2005 he received a PhD degree from the University of Colorado Denver for work related to the genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy. His clinical work centers primarily around the Adult Medical Genetics Clinic. This clinic is unique to the Rocky Mountain region and serves adult patients and families with genetic conditions. Genetic counseling, diagnostic, and management services are provided through this clinic, which is staffed by three genetic counselors and hosts genetic counseling students, genetics fellows, and internal medicine residents. An adult cardiovascular genetics effort has also been developed as this field overlaps with Dr. Taylor’s research interests and interfaces well with an existing adult congenital heart disease clinic in his division. Dr. Taylor in involved in clinical research into the basis of several genetic conditions that affect adults including: cardiomyopathies, intellectual disability, lysosomal storage diseases, pulmonary hypertension, and hypogonadism. Dr. Taylor’s research laboratory pursues basic molecular genetic research related to these human conditions and employs, SNP detection assays, DNA sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization in this regard, and Next Generation DNA sequencing. Two disease Registries are connected to this work: 1) the Familial Cardiomyopathy Registry and 2) the Danon Disease Registry (additional information located at: www.danondisease.org). Dr. Taylor’s group also participates in ongoing clinical trials and registries in the lysosomal storage disease field. Dr. Taylor’s education activities include directing the Molecule to Medicine curriculum for year I medical students as well as participating in other courses and programs for medical, doctoral, and masters students. Dr. Taylor is a member of executive committed for the U of Colorado MD-PhD program and is also a co-director of the Clinical Investigation in the Clinical Sciences PhD program. Dr. Taylor lives in Denver, Colorado with is wife, who is an obstetrician-gynecologist physician, and their two daughters.
    • Medical Oncology
    Associate Director for Translational Research, Yale
    Associate Director for Translational Research, Yale
    Dr. Roy S. Herbst is Ensign Professor of Medicine, Professor of Pharmacology, Chief of Medical Oncology, Director of the Thoracic Oncology Research Program, and Associate Director for Translational Research at Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT. Dr. Herbst has led the Phase I development of several of the new generation of targeted agents for NSCLC, including gefitinib, erlotinib, cetuximab, and bevacizumab. He is co-lead for the BATTLE-1 effort, co-leads the subsequent BATTLE-2 clinical trial program, and serves as a Co-Program Leader of the Developmental Therapeutics Program for the YCC Cancer Center Support Grant (CCSG). He is a member of the National Cancer Policy Forum for which he has organized an IOM meeting focused on policy issues in personalized medicine. His laboratory work is focused on angiogenesis and dual EGFR/VEGFR inhibition in NSCLC. Dr. Herbst is author or co-author of more than 250 publications, including peer-reviewed journal articles, abstracts, and book chapters. He has contributed his work to many prominent journals, such as Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet, and the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Herbst is an active member of ASCO, AACR, IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer), RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group), and SWOG (Southwest Oncology Group Lung Committee).
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Internist, Geneticist, Executive Committee Member of Johns Hopkins University/NIH Genetic Counseling Training Program
    Internist, Geneticist, Executive Committee Member of Johns Hopkins University/NIH Genetic Counseling Training Program
    Howard Levy, MD, PhD is board certified in and has been clinically practicing Internal Medicine since 1995 and Medical Genetics since 1999. He has extensive experience precepting and mentoring medical students, genetic counseling students, residents and fellows in multiple academic settings. He specializes in primary care of adults with genetic conditions, genetic risk assessment for common multifactorial diseases, pharmacogenetics and integration of genetics into primary care medicine. He provides medical services for adults with a wide variety of genetic disorders as well as general primary care patients, with whom he emphasizes genetic principles to improve routine care and preventive medicine. Dr. Levy is a co-developer and co-editor-in-chief of GeneFacts, an Internet-based clinical point of care information resource providing genetic information to non-geneticist clinicians, available at www.genefacts.org. Dr. Levy was a member of the review board for the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research CETT (Collaboration, Education and Test Translation) Program for Rare Genetic Disease from its inception in 2005 through 2010 (when it ceased active operation). He is on the executive committee of the Johns Hopkins/NIH Genetic Counseling Training program, and has served on many of the masters and PhD committees of the program’s graduates. He has been invited (and served) annually as a clinical genetics mentor to trainees at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting since 2010, and has presented a session on family history annually at the American Society of Human Genetics High School Workshop since 2006.
    • Reproductive Endocrinology/Infertility
    Director of Reproductive Medicine at IRMS
    Director of Reproductive Medicine at IRMS
    Serena Chen, MD, graduated from Brown University in Providence Rhode Island. She then attended Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, where she caught her first baby and decided to become an Obstetrician Gynecologist (it was a very cute baby). She then trained in Gynecology and Obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Chen had a hard time deciding what to do there because she loved delivering babies, loved doing surgery and loved seeing patients in the office. Of all the wonderful things in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology, she finally decided she was most fascinated by the world of test tube babies or IVF (In Vitro Fertilization) and so did her subspecialty training and became board certified in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, which she practices to this day. She is very honored that she has been voted by her peers to be a Top Doctor in the NJ Monthly survey every year from 2007 to 2014, and has also received Best Doctor honors from Castle Connelly, NY Magazine and others. She is currently Director of Reproductive Medicine at IRMS (Institute for Reproductive Medicine and Science) at Saint Barnabas and Clinical Associate Professor at Rutgers, UMDNJ, New Jersey Medical School. Dr Chen has put together countless numbers of eggs and sperm in little dishes and transferred countless embryos into women’s wombs (mostly one at a time) and made tons of babies. Dr Chen is also hard at work making sure that women are empowered with the knowledge to make informed decisions about their reproductive health. Dr Chen believes that knowledge is power and empowering patients with the knowledge they need to make the best decisions for themselves and their families will lower stress levels and allow people to journey through medical treatment in a healthier way. She loves inspiring her patients with information and ideas about their mental and physical health in an interesting and accessible way. In the office she does this one person at a time. On the world-wide-web and multiple social media platforms she hopes to give many more people who cannot come into the office, relevant, practical, accessible and interesting information that they can use to live better, healthier lives. Please follow her on Twitter and Instagram @DrSerenaHChen or visit her at www.sbivf.com
    • Pediatrics
    • Medical Genetics
    Kimberly V. Talley Chair of Genetics, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma
    Kimberly V. Talley Chair of Genetics, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma
    Dr. Mulvihill is a pediatrician and medical geneticist with 20 years' experience at the National Cancer Institute, where he was chief of the Clinical Genetics Section of the Clinical Epidemiology Branch and Director of the Interinstitute Medical Genetics Program of the National Institutes of Health. In 1990, he became founder, chair, and professor of Human Genetics at the University of Pittsburgh and Co-director of the Pittsburgh Genetics Institute. In 1998, he accepted the Children’s Medical Research Institute--Kimberly V. Talley Chair of Genetics, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma; he is also adjunct professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and of Pathology. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross, Dartmouth Medical School, and the University of Washington, he was on the house staff at University of Washington Hospital and at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He hs been a member of 13 professional societies, and co-founder and past president of the International Genetic Epidemiology Society. In addition to belonging to the editorial boards of eight scientific journals, he was co-editor-in-chief of Genetic Epidemiology and editor of the Neurofibromatosis Research Newsletter. In 1989, the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation awarded him its first Friedrich von Recklinghausen award. Mentoring is his major commitment. Dr. Mulvihill’s research has focused on the genetics of human cancer, with an emphasis on late genetic and reproductive effects in cancer survivors and on germ cell mutagenesis. He maintains a unique Registry of Pregnancies Exposed to Cancer Chemotherapy. He organized the first International Conferences on the Genetics of Human Cancer in 1975 and on Neurofibromatosis in 1980 and, in Oklahoma City in 2003, an International Conference on Family Cancer. He has had National Institutes of Health and other research grants for neurofibromatosis, pancreatic cancer, and fetal alcohol syndrome and has written 334 scientific articles and edited 15 monographs. Elected a Director of the American College of Medical Genetics, he is also is a member of the Committee on Ethics, Law, and Society of the International Human Genome Organisation (HUGO) and was a Scientific Advisor of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.