Critical Appraisal of the Medical Literature

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Experts
    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
    • Evidence-based medicine
    • Quality Improvement
    • Patient Safety
    • Physician Leadership Development
    • Physician Burnout
    • physician wellbeing
    • medical education
    • endocrinology
    • Neuroendocrinology
    Program Director Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoeniz, Assistant Professor of Medicine at UACOMP, Mayo School of Medicine and Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University. NIH Special researcher
    Program Director Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoeniz, Assistant...
    • Associate Professor of Medicine at The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix

    Ricardo Correa, MD, Es. D, FAPCR, FACE, CMQ is the fellowship director for the endocrinology, diabetes and metabolims program at University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, assistant professor of medicine for UACOMP, Mayo College of Medicine and Creighton University SOM. He is part of the Diversity and Inclusion Committee of the University and researcher in this area. Also he is editor of Dynamed and outreach unit director of Endotext.org and Thyroid manager.

    He completed his Medical School and Education Master at University of Panama. He completed a research fellowship in Epidemiology and Tropical disease at ICGES in Panama city.   He completed his internal medicine residency at Jackson Memorial hospital-University of Miami program and during his residency he was instructor of Medicine for the UM. In 2012, he was honored with the AOA from the UM. He completed his clinical and research fellowship in endocrinology with special focus in neuroendocrinology and National Institute of Health

    He was trained in EBM at McMaster University in Canada and in Editorial process and OJS by LATINDEX. He is co-director of the Panamanian Cochrane Center and EBM advocate.

    Dr. Correa has been involved in organized medicine since medical school. He has been president of the Latin American Medical Student Association (FELSOCEM), scientific committee chair and vice speaker for the AMA RFS, chair of the CoA for the ACP FC, Board of Trustee of the Maryland Medical Society, National Secretary of the CoA for the NHMA, Regional Vice President of the CIR, Medical Education Officer of JDN-WMA. He has been involve with local, regional and national organization in the area of medical education, leadership and physician wellbeing including the AMA joy in medicine organization, ACGME at different level including the duty hour task force, NBME as part of the board, NBPAS and other organization.

    Dr. Correa has been involved in multiple academic, scientific and educational activities including article Consultant, Interpretation of the Medical Literature Project, NBME, International Committee member of the Committee on publications ethics (COPE), World Association of Medical Editors, Deputy Editor of International Archives of Medicine, Editorial board and peer reviewer of multiple journals including Annals of Public Health, PAHO journal, SGIM journal, “Archivos de Medicine”, Pediatric care, International Journal of Endocrinology, International Journal of Diabetes, International Journal of Clinical Cases and Images, International journal of case reports, etc. Also he is consultant for Latinamerican science center including Bolivia and Panama national science department.

    He is board certified in Medical Quality. He is the author of the book title “Case report: basics and publication”. His research is focus on neuroendocrinology mainly on pituitary and adrenal tumor and new genetic mutations.

    • Pediatric Infectious Diseases
    • Professor of Pediatrics in Infectious Diseases at University of Tennessee School of Medicine

    Dr. DeVincenzo is a Practicing Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis Tennessee. He is also Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Biochemistry at the University of Tennessee School of Medicine. His research has focused on understanding the pathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) directly in children and using this understanding to develop therapeutic and prevention strategies against this virus.  He is the author of over 250 original published abstracts and papers on this subject.  Dr. DeVincenzo’s research initially focused on the immunogenetics of RSV disease and the interplay between viral dynamics and RSV disease severity in infants.  Subsequently, his research focus shifted to apply this knowledge of RSV dynamics to the development of novel therapeutics for RSV.  His development of RNA interference-based therapeutics for RSV has shown recent success.  For his groundbreaking proof of concept work applying RNA interference concepts to develop human therapeutics, Dr. DeVincenzo’s study was listed as one of the most influential papers in medicine in 2010 (American Society for Microbiology).  From this work, Dr. DeVincenzo is now developing antivirals and vaccines using a variety of approaches for RSV; from conception to proof of concept clinical trials through several academic, foundation, and industry pathways.  He and colleagues have now demonstrated the first evidence that treating an established RSV infection in humans can lower the viral load and result in reduced disease. He has recently extended similar proofs of human antiviral RSV-therapeutic efficacy for four other novel antiviral compounds with different mechanisms of action and is currently progressing several international RSV antiviral programs into pediatric and adult populations.

    Dr. DeVincenzo received his undergraduate degree in biology from Stanford University, and then attended Vanderbilt Medical School where he became interested in pediatric infectious diseases and earned his MD degree.  His internship and residency were completed at U.C.L.A Center for Health Sciences.  After finishing his pediatrics training, Dr. DeVincenzo studied tropical medicine at Walter Reed and practiced general medicine in Central Africa before starting formal training in Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.  During this time, he also completed a research fellowship at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute working with his mentor, George Siber, in developing passive antibody approaches for RSV treatment and prevention.  Dr. DeVincenzo has conducted numerous clinical and translational trials in children refining the pathogenesis of RSV and defining the role of prevention and therapeutic applications of monoclonal antibodies targeting RSV in infants and the immune suppressed.  He runs an active NIH-funded academic laboratory studying RSV and other respiratory viruses, and has received numerous honors for his research including honorary induction into Alpha Omega Alpha National Medical Honor Society (2009), the Healthcare Heroes Award for innovation (2008), and the best advance in Therapy and Prevention of a Microbial Disease (ICAAC 2007). Dr. DeVincenzo is currently also the medical director of the University affiliated Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Virology Laboratory and the Methodist/Le Bonheur Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory. He is a practicing pediatric infectious disease specialist, lectures at the Medical School, nationally and internationally, and is involved in award winning clinical teaching of medical students, residents, and fellows.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Pulmonary Disease
    Assistant Professor, Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington; Associate Program Director for Research & Scholarship, UW Internal Medicine Residency; Affiliate Investigator, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
    Assistant Professor, Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, University of Washington; Associate Program Director...
    • Associate Program Director, IM Residency at University of Washington

    As pulmonologist and intensivist, my clinical focus is managing complications of cancer therapy.  My prior research examined epidemiology of non-infectious lung injury and ICU outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation.  I will soon begin a new direction of inquiry that aims to strengthen the training of future physician-scientists during residency.

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