Ask the Experts: Infectious Diseases

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Experts
    • Public Health and General Preventive Medicine
    • HIV
    Director of the Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)
    Director of the Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)
    • Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) at University of KwaZulu-Natal

    Salim S. Abdool Karim is a South African clinical infectious diseases epidemiologist who is widely recognised for his research contributions in HIV prevention and treatment. He is Director of the Centre for the AIDS Program of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) and CAPRISA Professor of Global Health at Columbia University. He is Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research) at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, Adjunct Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard University, Boston and Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Cornell University, New York. He is also an Associate of The Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University. Dr Abdool Karim is Chair of the UNAIDS Scientific Expert Panel, WHO’s HIV Strategic and Technical Advisory Committee as well as the WHO TB-HIV Task Force. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Global Health of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society and a member of the US National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Microbiology and the Association of American Physicians. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the New England Journal of Medicine.

    • Infectious Disease
    • Internal Medicine
    Professor emeritus and Senior Advisor for Sutents
    Professor emeritus and Senior Advisor for Sutents
    • Senior Associate Dean for Students and Professor of Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Dr. Stephen Baum is currently emeritus professor of medicine and of microbiology & immunology, as well as senior advisor for student affairs. After joining the faculty as a research associate in 1968, Dr. Baum became, in rapid succession, director of the infectious disease service at Einstein Hospital, director of Einstein’s Medical Scientist Training Program (MD-PhD), one of the original chiefs of the department of medicine’s division of infectious diseases, and director of the office of graduate education. After moving to Beth Israel Medical Center in 1987 to chair its department of medicine, he returned to Einstein in 2007, where he began his role as dean for student affairs. . For the past decade, his sage counsel has guided Einstein students along their journey through medical school, into residency and, ultimately, into practice. Dr. Baum is a member of the editorial boards of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Infectious Diseases and Journal Watch Infectious Diseases, and author of numerous book chapters and peer-reviewed articles.  Early in his career he was chosen as Career Scientist by the Health Research Council of the City of New York. His excellence in teaching medical students has led to being elected twice to the Leo M. Davidoff Society―in 1980 and in 1996. He also was presented Einstein’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2008. Dr. Baum earned his undergraduate degree at Cornell University and his medical degree at New York University School of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency at Harvard Medical Service – Boston City Hospital, and spent two years as a research associate at the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He is a Fellow of  The American College of Physicians and the infectious Diseases Society of America.

  • Daniel Kaul, MD, is Professor of Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor. He directs the Transplant Infectious Disease Service and serves as Infectious Disease Fellowship Program Director. His research interests include infectious complications of solid-organ and stem-cell transplantation. He is past chair of the United Network for Organ Sharing’s Disease Transmission Advisory Committee and serves on the education committee of the American Society of Transplantation and the program directors committee of the Infectious Disease Society of America. He has written for NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases since 2017.

    • Infectious Disease
    • Professor of Medicine at University Regensburg

    Thomas Glück, MD, is Professor of Medicine at the University of Regensburg, Chief, Department of Internal Medicine, District Hospital Trostberg, and Chief, Infectious Diseases Consulting Service, District Hospitals, Traunstein and Trostberg, Bavaria, Germany. A member of the Bavarian infectious diseases specialty board, he received his specialty training in the U.S. His research interests include clinical sepsis, pathogenesis of sepsis, and infections in immunocompromised patients. Dr. Glück has been writing for NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases since 2004.