Authors
    • Neurology
    Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research
    Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research
    • Professor of Neurology at University of Newcastle upon Tyne
    Doug Turnbull, MD, PhD leads the Mitochondrial Research Group at Newcastle. His main research interest focus on faults in mitochondria, the “batteries” within cells that create energy. Defective mitochondria can cause around 150 known diseases and around one person in every 6,500 is affected by such conditions, which include fatal liver failure, stroke-like episodes, blindness, some forms of epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, diabetes and deafness. Dr. Turnbull’s team recently attracted world-wide attention after demonstrating that it is possible to bypass these diseases by replacing defective mitochondrial “batteries” in unfertilised human eggs. Dr. Turnbull is a Professor of Neurology at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne (1990-present) which is HEFCE funded; Honorary Consultant Neurologist at Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; National lead of the National Highly Specialised Services for Rare Mitochondrial Diseases of Children and Adults, which involves 3 centres (Newcastle, London and Oxford) and provides diagnostic and specialist clinical services for patients with mitochondrial diseases; and is Director of the Newcastle University Centre for Brain Ageing and Vitality sponsored by BBSRC, EPSRC, ESRC and MRC.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Neurology
    • Medical Genetics
    • Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine & OMM
    Neurologist at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research, Newcastle University, UK
    Neurologist at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research, Newcastle University, UK
    • Consultant Neurologist at Newcastle University
    Dr Gráinne S Gorman is a Consultant Neurologist at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research, and clinical lead of Movelab, the Muscle and Exercise Performance laboratory based at Newcastle University, UK. Dr Gorman attained her medical degree from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. After completion of specialist training in Neurology, in Dublin, she moved to Newcastle University to further her training in neuromuscular diseases and developed a specialist interest in mitochondrial myopathies. She now contributes, with other members of the clinical team, to the medical care of patients with mitochondrial diseases through the Newcastle Mitochondrial Centre that is one of only three highly specialised, national referral centres for mitochondrial disease in the UK. Her areas of research interest include 1) evaluating the genotypic and phenotypic correlates of mitochondrial disorders; 2) determining the prevalence of pathogenic nuclear and mitochondrial DNA mutations in adult mitochondrial diseases; 3) evaluating evidence-based physical activity and exercise interventions to devise and facilitate the prescription of safe and effective exercise protocols into clinical practice that will support patients with mitochondrial myopathies to sustain a more physically active lifestyle, whilst targeting the underlying disease mechanisms.