Experts
    • Medical Genetics
    President of Rare Genomics Institute
    President of Rare Genomics Institute
    • Director of Clinical Genomics at National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    Jimmy Lin, MD, PhD, MHS, is a 2012 TED Fellow and Founder & President of Rare Genomics Institute, the world’s first platform to enable any community to leverage cutting- edge biotechnology to advance understanding of any rare disease. Partnering with top medical institutions, RGI helps custom design personalized research projects for rare diseases. Dr. Lin is also the Director of Clinical Genomics at the Genetics Branch of the National Institute of Health/National Cancer Institute (NIH/NCI). Prior to this, he led the computational analysis of the first ever exome sequencing studies for any human disease at Johns Hopkins and was a research instructor at Washington University in St. Louis. He has numerous publications in Science, Nature, Cell, Nature Genetics, and Nature Biotechnology, and has been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, TIME, and the Huffington Post.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Oncology
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    PI of the Dana-Farber Clinical Computational Oncology Lab
    PI of the Dana-Farber Clinical Computational Oncology Lab
    Dr. Van Allen is an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a clinician at Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care. He is also a Research Associate at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. His research focuses on computational cancer genomics, the application of new technologies such as massively parallel sequencing to precision cancer medicine, and resistance to targeted therapeutics. As both a computational biologist and medical oncologist, he has specific expertise in clinical computational oncology and the development of algorithms to analyze and interpret genomic data for clinically focused questions. Overall, his research will make important contributions to the field of precision cancer medicine and resistance to targeted therapeutics via expertise and study in translational and clinical bioinformatics. Originally from Los Angeles, CA, he studied Symbolic Systems at Stanford University, obtained his M.D. from UCLA, and completed a residency in internal medicine at UCSF before coming to Boston and completing a medical oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care program.
    • Molecular Genetic Pathology
    CMO of 23andMe
    CMO of 23andMe
    Dr. Jill Hagenkord joined 23andMe in 2014 as chief medical officer. She serves as company liaison to physician, medical, genetics and research industry groups. Jill also oversees laboratory, shipping and fulfillment operations. Previously, Jill served as senior vice president of medical strategy for InVitae Corporation. Prior to Invitae, she was chief medical officer and senior vice president at Complete Genomics, Inc. Jill is a board-certified molecular genetic pathologist. She received her M.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine in 1999, did residency training at the University of California at San Francisco and the University of Iowa, and completed fellowships at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
    • Pediatrics
    • Medical Genetics
    President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics
    President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics
    Dr. Gail Herman, MD, PhD is a member of the Center for Molecular and Human Genetics in the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Research Institute and Dept of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Dr. Herman received her medical degree and a doctorate in biochemistry from Duke University. She then did training in Pediatrics and a fellowship in genetics at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. She is board certified as a clinical and biochemical geneticist and is the current President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Her research focuses on molecular basis of selected development disorders, including X-linked disorders of cholesterol synthesis and autism.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Oncology
    Director, Ludwig Center at Harvard
    Director, Ludwig Center at Harvard
    Dr. George Demetri received an undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from Harvard University, followed by a Rotary Foundation Fellowship to do research at the Université de Besancon, France, after which he received his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine, California, USA. After completing Internal Medicine residency and chief residency at the University of Washington Hospitals in Seattle, Washington, he pursued a fellowship in Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and Harvard Medical School, where he has served as an attending physician since 1989. Dr. Demetri and colleagues at Harvard have developed a large research-focused multidisciplinary center of excellence for sarcoma patients at the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, supporting a number of translational and clinical research projects in genomically-defined subsets of sarcomas. Dr. Demetri’s research and clinical interests have focused on mechanism-based drug development for solid tumors, with a particular emphasis on molecularly-defined subsets of sarcomas such as Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST). Work from the multidisciplinary team at Dana-Farber/Harvard has contributed to the development of several new drugs for sarcomas and other malignancies, including imatinib (Gleevec), sunitinib (Sutent), dasatinib (Sprycel), trabectedin (Yondelis), pazopanib (Votrient) and other new targeted therapies in development; in addition, as the medical oncologist on the scientific advisory board of Plexxikon, he was instrumental in the discovery and development of vemurafenib (Zelboraf). Dr Demetri serves as co-chair of the Medical Advisory Board for the Sarcoma Foundation of America as well as several scientific and editorial advisory boards. With an interest in internet-based medical and social network technologies, he is developing a novel web-based rapid learning community for sarcomas within CancerCommons.org.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Director, Adult Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Medicine, UC-Denver
    Director, Adult Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Medicine, UC-Denver
    Matthew Taylor MD, PhD received his undergraduate degree in Genetics from the University of California at Berkeley. After completing medical school at the University of Southern California, he moved to Colorado and completed residency training programs in Internal Medicine and Clinical Genetics. In 2001, he joined the University of Colorado Denver faculty in the Department of Internal Medicine, where he is currently an Associate Professor. In 2005 he received a PhD degree from the University of Colorado Denver for work related to the genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy. His clinical work centers primarily around the Adult Medical Genetics Clinic. This clinic is unique to the Rocky Mountain region and serves adult patients and families with genetic conditions. Genetic counseling, diagnostic, and management services are provided through this clinic, which is staffed by three genetic counselors and hosts genetic counseling students, genetics fellows, and internal medicine residents. An adult cardiovascular genetics effort has also been developed as this field overlaps with Dr. Taylor’s research interests and interfaces well with an existing adult congenital heart disease clinic in his division. Dr. Taylor in involved in clinical research into the basis of several genetic conditions that affect adults including: cardiomyopathies, intellectual disability, lysosomal storage diseases, pulmonary hypertension, and hypogonadism. Dr. Taylor’s research laboratory pursues basic molecular genetic research related to these human conditions and employs, SNP detection assays, DNA sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization in this regard, and Next Generation DNA sequencing. Two disease Registries are connected to this work: 1) the Familial Cardiomyopathy Registry and 2) the Danon Disease Registry (additional information located at: www.danondisease.org). Dr. Taylor’s group also participates in ongoing clinical trials and registries in the lysosomal storage disease field. Dr. Taylor’s education activities include directing the Molecule to Medicine curriculum for year I medical students as well as participating in other courses and programs for medical, doctoral, and masters students. Dr. Taylor is a member of executive committed for the U of Colorado MD-PhD program and is also a co-director of the Clinical Investigation in the Clinical Sciences PhD program. Dr. Taylor lives in Denver, Colorado with is wife, who is an obstetrician-gynecologist physician, and their two daughters.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Chief Technology Officer of Claritas Genomics
    Chief Technology Officer of Claritas Genomics
    • Chief Technology Officer at Claritas Genomics
    John’s career has spanned pharmaceutical, next-gen sequencing, and genetic testing industries. Joining Claritas Genomics in 2014 as Chief Technology Officer, he has spearheaded novel genetic assays using NGS for diagnosing pediatric diseases and applying DNA sequencing to clinical problems. At Nabsys, he served as Head of Assay Development for three years and advanced the mapping and sequencing of DNAs hundreds of kilobases long using fully solid-state nanodetectors. Before that, he was Senior Director of Genomic Research at Helicos BioSciences for four years, helping to develop the first commercial single-molecule, next-generation sequencing platform and applying it to a range of DNA and RNA sequencing applications. These sequencing endeavors followed 20 years at Pfizer where he applied molecular biology and genetic approaches to identify novel therapeutic targets, to establish the genetic basis of drug response, and to characterize the genetics of drug-induced adverse events. Prior to joining industry, he was a Research Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology at Brown University researching lambda site-specific DNA recombination, DNA bending, and protein-DNA interactions. This followed a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, Department of Chemistry, in which RNA and DNA structure and chemistry were studied. His BS in chemistry is from Yale University.
    • Clinical Biochemical Genetics
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Ass. Professor of Pediatrics, Div. Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Columbia University
    Ass. Professor of Pediatrics, Div. Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Columbia University
    • Attending Div. Clin. Genetics; Ass. Prof. Pediatrics at Columbia University in the City of New York
    Uta Lichter-Konecki, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Clinical Genetics in the Department of Pediatrics at Columbia University. Dr. Lichter-Konecki specializes in inborn errors of metabolism/inherited metabolic disease, PKU/hyperphenylalaninemia and urea cycle disorders, newborn screening follow-up, and genetic and genomic medicine. Dr. Lichte-Konecki's main interest has is the pathophysiology of the brain damage that occurs in many patients with inborn errors of metabolism especially urea cycle disorders and phenylketonuria and developing neuroprotective therapies for these conditions. Other research interests are renal Fanconi syndrome and lysosomal membrane proteins. Dr. Lichter-Konecki has initiated a study regarding the efficacy of hypothermia treatment in hyperammonemic encephalopathy. She has published over 70 peer reviewed articles and chapters. Dr. Lichter-Konecki is a member of the Therapeutics Committee of the American College of Medical Genetics and is a member of the Scientified Advisory Board of the National PKU Alliance.
    • Medical Oncology
    Associate Director for Translational Research, Yale
    Associate Director for Translational Research, Yale
    Dr. Roy S. Herbst is Ensign Professor of Medicine, Professor of Pharmacology, Chief of Medical Oncology, Director of the Thoracic Oncology Research Program, and Associate Director for Translational Research at Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT. Dr. Herbst has led the Phase I development of several of the new generation of targeted agents for NSCLC, including gefitinib, erlotinib, cetuximab, and bevacizumab. He is co-lead for the BATTLE-1 effort, co-leads the subsequent BATTLE-2 clinical trial program, and serves as a Co-Program Leader of the Developmental Therapeutics Program for the YCC Cancer Center Support Grant (CCSG). He is a member of the National Cancer Policy Forum for which he has organized an IOM meeting focused on policy issues in personalized medicine. His laboratory work is focused on angiogenesis and dual EGFR/VEGFR inhibition in NSCLC. Dr. Herbst is author or co-author of more than 250 publications, including peer-reviewed journal articles, abstracts, and book chapters. He has contributed his work to many prominent journals, such as Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet, and the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Herbst is an active member of ASCO, AACR, IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer), RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group), and SWOG (Southwest Oncology Group Lung Committee).
    • Neurology
    • Medical Genetics
    Director, G2P Research Program
    Director, G2P Research Program
    Robert C. Green, MD, MPH is a medical geneticist and physician-scientist who directs the G2P Research Program (genomes2people.org) in translational genomics and health outcomes in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Green is internationally recognized for designing and conducting empirical studies in genomic medicine. He led the first experimental trials disclosing common complex disease risk (the REVEAL Study), one of the first prospective studies of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services (the PGen Study) and was lead author on influential recommendations for incidental findings in clinical sequencing from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. He currently leads and co-leads the MedSeq Project and the BabySeq Project, respectively, two NIH-funded randomized trials designed to explore the medical, behavioral and economic implications of integrating genome sequencing into the medical care of adults and newborns. Dr. Green graduated from Amherst College and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, and earned a Masters of Public Health in epidemiology from Emory University School of Public Health. He obtained clinical specialty training at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in both neurology and medical genetics. He has been continuously funded by NIH for over 26 years and has published over 300 scientific articles. He is currently Associate Director for Research of Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine and a Board Member of the Council for Responsible Genetics. Key scientific contributions include publication of the first randomized trials to assess the impact of common complex genetic risk markers, empirical studies describing the medical and behavioral outcomes of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, and design of a single page summary for reporting whole genome sequencing to physicians. Dr. Green teaches medical students and mentors post-doctoral trainees and junior faculty in the clinical and research aspects of genomic medicine. Keynote and plenary presentations include the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor, World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Human Genome Variation Society, European Society for Human Genetics, the Forbes Healthcare Summit and the World Science Festival. His work has been featured on PBS radio and television documentaries, NBC Nightly News, the Today Show, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Time Magazine, Fast Company and other national media.
    • Cardiovascular Disease
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Molecular Genetics
    Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    • Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    Klaus Lindpaintner, MD, MPH, FACP serves as Chief Scientific Officer at Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world's leading provider of analytical instruments, reagents, and services, where he is spearheading efforts to drive innovation with regard to both content and process. Previously, he held senior positions at Hoffman-La Roche, where he spearheaded the company's efforts in personalized health care and was responsible for the respective activities in translational research that have rebranded the company's image; at SDIX, a specialty-antibody-focused biotechnology company; and on the faculty of Harvard Medical School. Klaus has co-authored more than 250 scientific papers, and holds honorary and adjunct professorships at several academic institutions. He serves on numerous boards, working groups, and advisory panels for trade organizations, regulatory authorities, and non-governmental organizations on issues related to the successful implementation and leverage of novel technologies in health care and industrial applications, as well as on the ethical and societal impact of these technologies. Klaus graduated from Innsbruck University Medical School with a degree in medicine, and from Harvard University with a degree in public health. He pursued post-graduate training and specialization in internal medicine, cardiology, and clinical and molecular genetics in the US and Germany, and is a Diplomate of the Boards in these specialties.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    • Pediatrics - Child Neurology
    Chair, Department of Genetic, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Chair, Department of Genetic, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD, is the Wayne H. and Sara Crews Finley Chair in Medical Genetics, Professor and Chair of the Department of Genetics, Director of the Heflin Center for Genomic Sciences at UAB, and Co-Director of the UAB-Hudson Alpha Center for Genomic Medicine. He is a medical geneticist, pediatrician, and child neurologist, certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics (clinical genetics, clinical cytogenetics, clinical molecular genetics), American Board of Pediatrics, and American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (child neurology). Dr. Korf is the past president of the Association of Professors of Human and Medical Genetics, past president of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, and current president of the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine. He has served on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute at the NIH. His major research interests are molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders and the natural history, genetics, and treatment of neurofibromatosis. He serves as principal investigator of the Department of Defense funded Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium. He is co-author of Human Genetics and Genomics (medical student textbook, now in fourth edition), Medical Genetics at a Glance (medical student textbook, now in third edition), Emery and Rimoin’s Principles and Practice of Medical Genetics (now in 6th edition), and Current Protocols in Human Genetics.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Clinical Molecular Genetics
    • Pediatrics
    Medical Director at Claritas Genomics
    Medical Director at Claritas Genomics
    David T. Miller, MD, PhD, is a Medical Geneticist at Boston Children's Hospital, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and Medical Director at Claritas Genomics, a provider of genomic testing services. Dr. Miller’s experience as a clinician who orders genetic tests and provides results directly to patients, combined with expertise in developing and performing laboratory diagnostic assays, provides him with a unique perspective on clinical genetic testing. His academic work has focused on discovery of new genetic syndromes through genetic testing, demonstrating the value and utility of clinical genetic testing, and the development of best practices for clinical genetic testing. He received his MD and PhD degrees from Washington University in St. Louis, completed a residency in Pediatrics at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and residency/fellowship in Medical Genetics and Clinical Molecular Genetics at Harvard Medical School. He is board-certified in Pediatrics, Clinical Genetics, and Clinical Molecular Genetics.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Internist, Geneticist, Executive Committee Member of Johns Hopkins University/NIH Genetic Counseling Training Program
    Internist, Geneticist, Executive Committee Member of Johns Hopkins University/NIH Genetic Counseling Training Program
    Howard Levy, MD, PhD is board certified in and has been clinically practicing Internal Medicine since 1995 and Medical Genetics since 1999. He has extensive experience precepting and mentoring medical students, genetic counseling students, residents and fellows in multiple academic settings. He specializes in primary care of adults with genetic conditions, genetic risk assessment for common multifactorial diseases, pharmacogenetics and integration of genetics into primary care medicine. He provides medical services for adults with a wide variety of genetic disorders as well as general primary care patients, with whom he emphasizes genetic principles to improve routine care and preventive medicine. Dr. Levy is a co-developer and co-editor-in-chief of GeneFacts, an Internet-based clinical point of care information resource providing genetic information to non-geneticist clinicians, available at www.genefacts.org. Dr. Levy was a member of the review board for the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research CETT (Collaboration, Education and Test Translation) Program for Rare Genetic Disease from its inception in 2005 through 2010 (when it ceased active operation). He is on the executive committee of the Johns Hopkins/NIH Genetic Counseling Training program, and has served on many of the masters and PhD committees of the program’s graduates. He has been invited (and served) annually as a clinical genetics mentor to trainees at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting since 2010, and has presented a session on family history annually at the American Society of Human Genetics High School Workshop since 2006.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Professor of Genetics and Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill
    Professor of Genetics and Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill
    James P. Evans, MD, PhD, is the Bryson Distinguished Professor of Genetics and Medicine at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He directs Adult and Cancer Genetics Services and is clinically active in both Medical Genetics and General Medicine. After obtaining his MD and PhD from the University of Kansas he served as Intern, Resident and Chief Resident of Internal Medicine at The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and then trained in Medical Genetics at The University of Washington in Seattle. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Medical Genetics and in Molecular Diagnostics. Dr. Evans's research interests focus primarily on the applications of next generation genomic analytic technologies in Medicine and broad issues of how genetic information is used and perceived. He has been extensively involved in policy issues both nationally and internationally. He was an advisor to the US Secretary of Health and Human Services on the subject of “Genetics, Health and Society” from 2004-2010 and has been actively involved both nationally and around the world in the education of high court judges about Genetics and scientific matters as described in the New York Times in July of 2008. In 2010 Dr. Evans testified before the US Congress regarding the regulation of genetic testing and has advised the Government Accountability Office on the same subject. In 2011 he was asked to address the US Presidential Commission on Bioethics regarding genetic testing. He has participated in numerous briefings of members of the US Congress regarding matters related to Genetics and participated as faculty and organizer of a United Nations Conference in Concepción, Chile regarding global access to advanced medical technology. Dr. Evans lives in Chapel Hill; he enjoys reading and bicycle riding in his spare time, though not simultaneously.
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Medical Genetics
    Professor & Chief Maternal-Fetal Medicine Medicine, UF ObGyn
    Professor & Chief Maternal-Fetal Medicine Medicine, UF ObGyn
    Dr. Tony Gregg joined the University of Florida Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology as Professor, and Chief, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine in June 2011. He is the Director of Obstetrics for UF Health. He also serves as Director of the UF Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellowship Training Program. He received formal medical training at Loyola University and Loyola Foster McGaw Hospital (medical school and residency), the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (maternal fetal medicine) and Baylor College of Medicine (medical genetics). Tony is certified by the American Board of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics. He is certified to practice in general obstetrics and gynecology, maternal fetal medicine and medical genetics. His motivation towards genetics training was to better understand maternal medical complications of pregnancy, to this end he pursued mouse modeling of preeclampsia. He has had research funding by private organizations and foundations as well as small NIH awards. He has held a six year positions as the treasurer of the Perinatal Research Society and as a member of the Board of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). He is a past Chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Genetics and he is currently a liaison to this Committee for the ACMG. He is interested in the implementation of next generation sequencing technology into prenatal care. His focus is technology aimed at detecting chromosome abnormalities (NIPS) and expanded carrier screening.
    • Rheumatology
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Head of Department of Genetics & Pharmacogenomics at Merck
    Head of Department of Genetics & Pharmacogenomics at Merck
    • Co-Chair of the Early Discovery Council at Merck
    Robert is Vice President at MRL in Boston, MA. He is founder and worldwide Head of the newly created Department of Genetics & Pharmacogenomics (GpGx). His Department, which is part of Early Development and Discovery Sciences (EDDS) under the direction of Dr. Rupert Vessey, is responsible for genetics and pharmacogenomics strategy throughout Merck’s entire pipeline – from early discovery to late-stage clinical development. Further, Robert is co-Chair of the Early Discovery Council (which oversees pre-lead optimization research programs); serves a key leadership role at the Boston MRL site, including external research opportunities; and is on the Steering Committee for the Merck-Singapore research collaboration. Prior to joining Merck in July 2013, Robert served as Director of Genetics & Genomics in the Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. His academic research focused on genetic and genomic underpinnings of complex human disease, with attention to immune-mediated diseases such rheumatoid arthritis (RA). He led multi-disciplinary teams that: identified new genetic risk factors for RA and other complex traits; performed functional studies of risk alleles to understand fundamental disease mechanisms; analyzed clinical data from electronic medical records (EMR) for discovery research in collaboration with i2b2; and investigated pharmacogenomic predictors of efficacy and toxicity as part of the NIH-funded Pharmacogenomic Research Network (PGRN). His original research has been published in Nature, New England Journal of Medicine, Science, Nature Genetics, and other top-tiered medical journals. Robert graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science from the University of California, San Diego in 1992; received his MD and PhD degrees from Case Western Reserve University in 2000 (thesis advisor Hunt Willard); completed his Internal Medicine residency as a Molecular Medicine Fellow at University of California, San Francisco in 2002; and served as rheumatology fellow at Brigham and Women’s Hospital from 2002-2006 and post-doctoral research fellow at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard from 2003-2007 (advisor David Altshuler). Between 2007-2013 he was on the faculty of Harvard Medical School and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute while practicing clinical rheumatology and running a research laboratory at Brigham & Women’s Hospital. In recognition of his accomplishments, Robert has received numerous awards, including: Pre-doctoral Clinical Award from The American Society of Human Genetics (1995); The Young Investigator Award from the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (2008); Career Award for Medical Scientists from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (2008); and election to The American Society for Clinical Investigation (2012). He lives with his wife and three daughters in Wellesley, MA. He enjoys outdoor activities, socializing with friends and family, and participating in any activities that his kids want him to do.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Otolaryngology
    • Plastic Surgery Within the Head and Neck
    Director of Medical Affairs, 23andMe
    Director of Medical Affairs, 23andMe
    Jeffrey D. Pollard, MD is a fellowship trained and double board certified physician and surgeon who joined 23andMe as Director of Medical Affairs in 2012 and is passionate about advancing the integration of personal genomics into the modern healthcare environment through educational initiatives and strategic partnerships with integral members of the healthcare system.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    Healthcare Consultant at Maine Medical Center
    Healthcare Consultant at Maine Medical Center
    Tom Brewster, MD, is a Healthcare Consultant at Maine Medical Center Physician Hospital Organization, where he works on health care delivery, payment reform, and genomic medicine. He is also on the Joint Advisory Committee of the Maine Genetics and Newborn Screening Program and Board of Directors of the New England Regional Genetics Group. Prior to the last 3 years, Dr. Brewster was an Attending Physician at Maine Medical Center for 33 years, where he was the Director of the Metabolism Program. Dr. Brewster received his medical school training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He went on to complete a pediatric residency at the University of Pennsylvania Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Finally, he completed his Genetics and Metabolism Fellowship at the Harvard-affiliated Boston Children's Hospital. He is an Emeritus Fellow of the American College of Genetics and Genomics and FAAP.
    • Medical Biochemical Genetics
    • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    • Pediatrics
    • Medical Genetics
    • Languages: Finnish (native), English (fluent), Spanish (fluent), Swedish (relatively fluent), French (basics)
    Pediatrician, Neonatal (NICU) hospitalist, Medical Biochemical Geneticist, Clinical Geneticist, Co-Director of Pediatric Integrative Medicine (PIM) Residency program, Stanford Children's Hospital & Stanford University, California, USA
    Pediatrician, Neonatal (NICU) hospitalist, Medical Biochemical Geneticist, Clinical Geneticist, Co-Director of Pediatric...
    Annakaisa Niemi, MD, PhD, is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Neonatology (primary), General Pediatrics and Medical Genetics at Stanford University. She is also a Co-Director of Pediatric Integrative Medicine (PIM) Residency program, a member of the Pediatric Integrative Medicine (IM) Core Group at Stanford Children's, and an Editor of the Metabolic Genetic chapters at PEMSoft/EBSCO. Dr. Niemi is the past Recipient of the Genzyme/ACMGF Clinical Genetics Fellowship in Biochemical Genetics Award (award period 7/2011-6/2012) and of the United Mitochondrial Diseases Foundation (UMDF) Clinical Fellowship Award (award period 8/2013-8/2014). Dr. Niemi's PhD thesis was on the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in longevity and elite athletic performance. She has a special interest in Medical Biochemical Genetics, Medical Genetics, Pediatrics, Neonatology and Newborn Care, Integrative Medicine, Organ Transplants for Inborn Errors of Metabolism, and Palliative Care. Additionally, Dr. Niemi is active in blogging & writing (Facebook: Dr. AnnaKaisa, Twitter: @DrAnnakaisa). She has a special passion for creativity in science, medical education, making science & medicine understandable to everyone, children's & human rights, sustainability, and nature & outdoors.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Physician-in-Chief, Dept of Med, MGH
    Physician-in-Chief, Dept of Med, MGH
    Katrina Armstrong, MD, MSCE, is Professor of Clinical Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Physician-in-Chief, Department of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Dr. Armstrong is a graduate of Yale University and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She was a resident and chief resident in Medicine at Johns Hopkins and completed a general internal medicine fellowship and Masters of Science in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1998, she joined the faculty at Penn and became Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine in 2008. At Penn, she also served as Associate Director of the Abramson Cancer Center and Co-Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. In April of 2013, she was appointed as physician-in-chief of the MGH Department of Medicine. Dr. Armstrong is an internationally recognized investigator in the areas of medical decision making, quality of care, and cancer prevention and outcomes. For her work, she received the Outstanding Junior Investigator of the Year Award from the Society of General Internal Medicine, the Alice Hersh Award from Academy Health, election to the American Society of Clinical and the Outstanding Investigator Award from the American Federation of Medical Research. Her research program has received extensive federal funding, including awards from the National Cancer Institute, the National Human Genome Research Institute, American Cancer Society, Department of Defense and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Most recently, she is leading the NCI funded Center for Innovation in Personalized Screening, part of the national PROSPR network. She has over 130 peer-reviewed articles in highly regarded journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA and the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Armstrong is an actively practicing general internist. She has a longitudinal primary care practice as well as serving as an ambulatory preceptor for the internal medicine residency and an attending on the inpatient general medicine service. Dr. Armstrong co-developed the course on clinical decision making for the Penn undergraduate medical curriculum and founded the Masters program in Health Policy Research at Penn for which she has received multiple teaching awards.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    Assist. Prof. Clinical Medicine, Human & Molecular Genetics, Nationwide Children's Hospital
    Assist. Prof. Clinical Medicine, Human & Molecular Genetics, Nationwide Children's Hospital
    Dr. Murugu Manickam received his Bachelor of Arts (with honors) from Case Western Reserve University and his Medical Degree from The Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin, Ireland (with honors). He completed an Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency in at MetroHealth Hospital (Case Western School of Medicine) and a Clinical Genetics residency at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Manickam is a Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine (2007) and the American Board of Medical Genetics (2009). He has nearly completed a Masters of Public Health in Public Health Leadership from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Dr. Manickam was a visiting scholar/externship with NHGRI and was selected for a NIH training program in Comparative Effectiveness Research through the Ohio State School of Public Health. Dr. Manickam is currently an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Human and Molecular Genetics (Department of Pediatrics) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. He also has a joint appointment in the Division of Human Genetics in the Department of Internal Medicine at The Ohio State University and the James Cancer Hospital. At Nationwide Children’s Hospital Dr. Manickam provides clinical genetic services with the Genetics Center, as well as in several outreach clinics. At the Ohio State University he is involved in the Medical Genetics Program, Adult Down syndrome Clinic. He also works closely with Nisonger Center in developing adults with disabilities programs. In addition to developing and directing a P4 Medicine Summer Intensive course for 2nd year medical students, he is a member of the College of Medicine’s curriculum development team. Dr. Manickam is a co-PI for the OSU/Coriell Institute collaborative Personalized Medicine study and authored several articles in the area of genomics. He is a member of the Pharmacogenomics Research Network, EPIC genomics working group and the CDC Working Group on Family History/Electronic Medical Record.
    • Medical Genetics
    CEO & Founder, InnVentis
    CEO & Founder, InnVentis
    • Scientific Advisory Board at Metabolomic Discoveries
    Thomas Wilckens is an MD and a serial entrepreneur. His current venture InnVentis focusses on the convergence of multi-omics technologies Big DATA/machine learning and real-world clinical data to enable PRECISION MEDICINE. Thomas is also the founder of the LinkedIn group “PRECISION MEDICINE & Big DATA in Life Sciences”. Besides InnVentis, Thomas also serves as Associate at deep innovation GmbH, a boutique consultancy headed by the fmr. Head Group R&D Vodafone. Before joining deep innovation, he headed a drug discovery company as CEO/CSO with a focus on inflammatory and metabolic diseases. Thomas obtained his MD at the Ludwig-Maximilian University before heading off to basic research as a scholar of the Max-Planck Society and the Max-Kade Foundation, NY. Aside from his work in biomedicine and mobile ICT he developed a novel concept for value creation in research intensive industries; i.e. Symbiotic Innovation. With regard to this project Thomas is an associate at the GLORAD Research Center for Global R&D Management St. Gallen/Shanghai. Thomas is the owner and group manager of PRECISION MEDICINE & Big DATA @LinkedIn
    • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology
    Senior Physician, Pediatric Oncology Dana-Farber / Boston Children's
    Senior Physician, Pediatric Oncology Dana-Farber / Boston Children's
    Katherine A. Janeway, MD is a Senior Attending Physician in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children’s Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Her primary areas of research focus are: 1) understanding the application of cancer genomics to the pediatric oncology clinic and 2) identifying central oncogenic mechanisms, novel drug targets and new therapeutics for pediatric sarcomas – specifically gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and osteosarcoma – diseases in pediatric oncology particularly in need of scientific and clinical advances. To facilitate a translational approach to research, Dr. Janeway has clinical expertise and clinical and administrative roles related to her research interests. As the leader of the Sarcoma Program for Dana Farber Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, she is responsible for programmatic initiatives that will enhance our ability to offer the best options for treatment and clinical research to patients with sarcomas. As Vice Chair of the Children’s Oncology Group Bone Tumor Committee, she is involved in setting the clinical research agenda, and guiding protocol development for collaborative studies in the childhood bone tumors Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma. She sits on three local committees shaping development of clinical genomics at Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children’s Hospital. Finally, she is the co-chair of the target and agent prioritization committee for the pediatric Children’s Oncology Group, NCI-MATCH study. Dr. Janeway received her MD from Harvard Medical School in 2000 and a Masters of Medical Science from Harvard Medical School in 2008. She completed her residency in Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Boston, where she later served as Chief Resident. Dr. Janeway then completed her fellowship in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Boston Children’s Hospital, where she joined the staff in 2007.
    • Internal Medicine
    PI, Million Veteran Program, Department of Veterans Affairs
    PI, Million Veteran Program, Department of Veterans Affairs
    Dr Gaziano is a nationally and internationally recognized chronic disease epidemiologist. He has a particular interest in the roles that individual lifestyle choices (diet, exercise, smoking), metabolic factors (obesity, high cholesterol, and hypertension), and biochemical and genetic markers play on the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke. Also of interest is the impact that vascular disease has on other organ systems, including cognitive dysfunction and renal disease. Recently, Dr. Gaziano has initiated a number of research projects to investigate the diverse nature of atherosclerosis. While atherosclerosis plaques form only in certain large and medium-sized vessels, the process of atherogenesis (the formation of plaque in the inner lining of arteries) affects arteries of all sizes. For example, cognitive decline and osteoporosis-related fractures have been linked to various cardiovascular disease risk factors, suggesting a role for small vessel disease in vascular dementia and in abnormal bone remodeling. These projects are intended to explore the extent to which atherosclerotic disease in small vessels leads to these and other chronic conditions, such as renal failure. Two internationally known and widely utilized resources are the centerpieces of his research: the Physicians' Health Study (PHS) and the Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC) databases. Dr. Gaziano is principal investigator for the internationally known PHS II study, a large-scale trial of vitamins in the prevention of chronic disease. He is also co-director of MAVERIC, which is one of three national centers of epidemiology funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Through MAVERIC, he recently became the principal investigator of the newly launched MVP (Million Veteran Program) study, which is in the process of recruiting a million participants for this major initiative in genetic epidemiology. In addition, he serves as the director of the Geriatric Research and Education Center (GRECC) at the VA Boston Healthcare System.
    • Medical Genetics
    Division Head, Center for Medical Genetics at NorthShore University HealthSystem
    Division Head, Center for Medical Genetics at NorthShore University HealthSystem
    • Clinical Assistant Professor at Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago
    Peter J. Hulick is a medical geneticist and the Division Head for the Center for Medical Genetics at NorthShore University HealthSystem. He has an appointment of Clinical Assistant Professor at the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. Dr. Hulick received his undergraduate degree in biology from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL and his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College, in Philadelphia, PA. He completed an internal medicine residency at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL before pursuing his clinical medical genetics residency at Harvard Medical School. Current clinical interests, in addition to general genetic syndromes, include pharmacogenetics, cardiovascular and cancer genetics, and the integration of genomic information into the healthcare system. Current research activities include studies that identify and measure the influences of our genes on health and how to effectively manage these risks. He is also active in leading efforts to incorporate genomic information and testing into the NorthShore University HealthSystem.
    • Pediatric Endocrinology
    • Population health informatics
    Co-Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics, HMS
    Co-Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics, HMS

    Isaac Kohane is the Chair of the Depasrtment of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School.