Experts
    • Molecular Genetic Pathology
    CMO of 23andMe
    CMO of 23andMe
    Dr. Jill Hagenkord joined 23andMe in 2014 as chief medical officer. She serves as company liaison to physician, medical, genetics and research industry groups. Jill also oversees laboratory, shipping and fulfillment operations. Previously, Jill served as senior vice president of medical strategy for InVitae Corporation. Prior to Invitae, she was chief medical officer and senior vice president at Complete Genomics, Inc. Jill is a board-certified molecular genetic pathologist. She received her M.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine in 1999, did residency training at the University of California at San Francisco and the University of Iowa, and completed fellowships at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
    • Medical Oncology
    Associate Director for Translational Research, Yale
    Associate Director for Translational Research, Yale
    Dr. Roy S. Herbst is Ensign Professor of Medicine, Professor of Pharmacology, Chief of Medical Oncology, Director of the Thoracic Oncology Research Program, and Associate Director for Translational Research at Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT. Dr. Herbst has led the Phase I development of several of the new generation of targeted agents for NSCLC, including gefitinib, erlotinib, cetuximab, and bevacizumab. He is co-lead for the BATTLE-1 effort, co-leads the subsequent BATTLE-2 clinical trial program, and serves as a Co-Program Leader of the Developmental Therapeutics Program for the YCC Cancer Center Support Grant (CCSG). He is a member of the National Cancer Policy Forum for which he has organized an IOM meeting focused on policy issues in personalized medicine. His laboratory work is focused on angiogenesis and dual EGFR/VEGFR inhibition in NSCLC. Dr. Herbst is author or co-author of more than 250 publications, including peer-reviewed journal articles, abstracts, and book chapters. He has contributed his work to many prominent journals, such as Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet, and the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Herbst is an active member of ASCO, AACR, IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer), RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group), and SWOG (Southwest Oncology Group Lung Committee).
    • Pediatrics
    • Medical Genetics
    Kimberly V. Talley Chair of Genetics, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma
    Kimberly V. Talley Chair of Genetics, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma
    Dr. Mulvihill is a pediatrician and medical geneticist with 20 years' experience at the National Cancer Institute, where he was chief of the Clinical Genetics Section of the Clinical Epidemiology Branch and Director of the Interinstitute Medical Genetics Program of the National Institutes of Health. In 1990, he became founder, chair, and professor of Human Genetics at the University of Pittsburgh and Co-director of the Pittsburgh Genetics Institute. In 1998, he accepted the Children’s Medical Research Institute--Kimberly V. Talley Chair of Genetics, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma; he is also adjunct professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and of Pathology. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross, Dartmouth Medical School, and the University of Washington, he was on the house staff at University of Washington Hospital and at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He hs been a member of 13 professional societies, and co-founder and past president of the International Genetic Epidemiology Society. In addition to belonging to the editorial boards of eight scientific journals, he was co-editor-in-chief of Genetic Epidemiology and editor of the Neurofibromatosis Research Newsletter. In 1989, the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation awarded him its first Friedrich von Recklinghausen award. Mentoring is his major commitment. Dr. Mulvihill’s research has focused on the genetics of human cancer, with an emphasis on late genetic and reproductive effects in cancer survivors and on germ cell mutagenesis. He maintains a unique Registry of Pregnancies Exposed to Cancer Chemotherapy. He organized the first International Conferences on the Genetics of Human Cancer in 1975 and on Neurofibromatosis in 1980 and, in Oklahoma City in 2003, an International Conference on Family Cancer. He has had National Institutes of Health and other research grants for neurofibromatosis, pancreatic cancer, and fetal alcohol syndrome and has written 334 scientific articles and edited 15 monographs. Elected a Director of the American College of Medical Genetics, he is also is a member of the Committee on Ethics, Law, and Society of the International Human Genome Organisation (HUGO) and was a Scientific Advisor of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Director, Adult Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Medicine, UC-Denver
    Director, Adult Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Medicine, UC-Denver
    Matthew Taylor MD, PhD received his undergraduate degree in Genetics from the University of California at Berkeley. After completing medical school at the University of Southern California, he moved to Colorado and completed residency training programs in Internal Medicine and Clinical Genetics. In 2001, he joined the University of Colorado Denver faculty in the Department of Internal Medicine, where he is currently an Associate Professor. In 2005 he received a PhD degree from the University of Colorado Denver for work related to the genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy. His clinical work centers primarily around the Adult Medical Genetics Clinic. This clinic is unique to the Rocky Mountain region and serves adult patients and families with genetic conditions. Genetic counseling, diagnostic, and management services are provided through this clinic, which is staffed by three genetic counselors and hosts genetic counseling students, genetics fellows, and internal medicine residents. An adult cardiovascular genetics effort has also been developed as this field overlaps with Dr. Taylor’s research interests and interfaces well with an existing adult congenital heart disease clinic in his division. Dr. Taylor in involved in clinical research into the basis of several genetic conditions that affect adults including: cardiomyopathies, intellectual disability, lysosomal storage diseases, pulmonary hypertension, and hypogonadism. Dr. Taylor’s research laboratory pursues basic molecular genetic research related to these human conditions and employs, SNP detection assays, DNA sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization in this regard, and Next Generation DNA sequencing. Two disease Registries are connected to this work: 1) the Familial Cardiomyopathy Registry and 2) the Danon Disease Registry (additional information located at: www.danondisease.org). Dr. Taylor’s group also participates in ongoing clinical trials and registries in the lysosomal storage disease field. Dr. Taylor’s education activities include directing the Molecule to Medicine curriculum for year I medical students as well as participating in other courses and programs for medical, doctoral, and masters students. Dr. Taylor is a member of executive committed for the U of Colorado MD-PhD program and is also a co-director of the Clinical Investigation in the Clinical Sciences PhD program. Dr. Taylor lives in Denver, Colorado with is wife, who is an obstetrician-gynecologist physician, and their two daughters.
    • Pediatrics
    • Medical Genetics
    President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics
    President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics
    Dr. Gail Herman, MD, PhD is a member of the Center for Molecular and Human Genetics in the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Research Institute and Dept of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Dr. Herman received her medical degree and a doctorate in biochemistry from Duke University. She then did training in Pediatrics and a fellowship in genetics at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX. She is board certified as a clinical and biochemical geneticist and is the current President of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Her research focuses on molecular basis of selected development disorders, including X-linked disorders of cholesterol synthesis and autism.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Otolaryngology
    • Plastic Surgery Within the Head and Neck
    Director of Medical Affairs, 23andMe
    Director of Medical Affairs, 23andMe
    Jeffrey D. Pollard, MD is a fellowship trained and double board certified physician and surgeon who joined 23andMe as Director of Medical Affairs in 2012 and is passionate about advancing the integration of personal genomics into the modern healthcare environment through educational initiatives and strategic partnerships with integral members of the healthcare system.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Internist, Geneticist, Executive Committee Member of Johns Hopkins University/NIH Genetic Counseling Training Program
    Internist, Geneticist, Executive Committee Member of Johns Hopkins University/NIH Genetic Counseling Training Program
    Howard Levy, MD, PhD is board certified in and has been clinically practicing Internal Medicine since 1995 and Medical Genetics since 1999. He has extensive experience precepting and mentoring medical students, genetic counseling students, residents and fellows in multiple academic settings. He specializes in primary care of adults with genetic conditions, genetic risk assessment for common multifactorial diseases, pharmacogenetics and integration of genetics into primary care medicine. He provides medical services for adults with a wide variety of genetic disorders as well as general primary care patients, with whom he emphasizes genetic principles to improve routine care and preventive medicine. Dr. Levy is a co-developer and co-editor-in-chief of GeneFacts, an Internet-based clinical point of care information resource providing genetic information to non-geneticist clinicians, available at www.genefacts.org. Dr. Levy was a member of the review board for the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research CETT (Collaboration, Education and Test Translation) Program for Rare Genetic Disease from its inception in 2005 through 2010 (when it ceased active operation). He is on the executive committee of the Johns Hopkins/NIH Genetic Counseling Training program, and has served on many of the masters and PhD committees of the program’s graduates. He has been invited (and served) annually as a clinical genetics mentor to trainees at the American Society of Human Genetics meeting since 2010, and has presented a session on family history annually at the American Society of Human Genetics High School Workshop since 2006.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    CEO of Claritas Genomics
    CEO of Claritas Genomics
    • Chief Executive Officer at Claritas Genomics
    Patrice, a pioneer at the interface of genomics and medicine, joined Claritas Genomics to realize the power of combining next-generation DNA sequencing technology with the clinical expertise of the world’s best pediatric specialists to inform and improve patient care. Previously, Patrice served as the Boston Site Head for Pfizer’s Centers of Therapeutic Innovation and Precision Medicine Lead, establishing academic medical center partnerships, including Beth Israel, Boston Children’s Hospital, Tufts Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine and Partners Healthcare, to establish proof of mechanism for novel targets and pathways aiming to treat human disease. She previously served as the Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer for Helicos BioSciences, Cambridge, MA. Her expertise and extensive knowledge in the life sciences helped advance the company’s efforts to develop and apply innovative and breakthrough single molecule DNA and RNA sequencing technology with recent focus on molecular diagnostics. Patrice previously served as Executive Director for Pfizer Global Research and Development with responsibilities for leadership of pharmacogenomics, proteomics, metabonomics, DNA sequencing, RNA profiling, and translational biomarkers applied across the Pfizer portfolio from early discovery into the marketplace. She conducted post-doctoral fellowships at Brown University and Harvard University. She earned her MS and PhD degrees at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY.
    • Interventional Cardiology
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Clinical Cardiologist & Human Geneticist
    Clinical Cardiologist & Human Geneticist
    • Associate Member of Medical & Population Genetics at Broad Institute
    Sekar Kathiresan, MD, a clinical cardiologist and human geneticist, is the director of preventive cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital and a genetics researcher in the Broad Institute’s Program in Medical and Population Genetics. Kathiresan seeks to discover the genes responsible for inter-individual differences in risk for myocardial infarction (MI) and use this information to understand biological mechanisms and to improve preventive cardiac care. Kathiresan’s scientific contributions fall into three domains – gene discovery, biology, and clinical application. 1. Gene discovery: i) Through genetic studies in populations, he and collaborators have discovered 45 gene regions related to risk for MI and 157 gene regions related to risk factors including blood cholesterol and triglycerides; ii) He has described a new Mendelian syndrome, familial combined hypolipidemia, which is characterized by extremely low levels of plasma lipids, and identified ANGPTL3 as the responsible gene; iii) Using exome sequencing in populations, he recently defined a new protective gene for MI: a triglyceride-regulating protein called apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) 2. Biology: i) At the sortilin locus for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and MI risk, he used cellular and mouse models to define the causal variant, gene, and mechanism responsible for the plasma lipid change. 3. Clinical application: i) He validated the concept of a genetic risk score and defined a panel of gene variants that can be used to assess future risk for MI; ii) He has utilized gene variants to show that some means of raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol may not lower risk for MI and that beyond LDL cholesterol, plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins likely represent causal risk factors for MI. Kathiresan is the current director of preventive cardiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Heart Center and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He received his B.A. in history and graduated summa cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. He received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1997. Kathiresan completed his clinical training in internal medicine and cardiology at MGH. He served as Chief Resident in Internal Medicine at MGH in 2002-2003. Kathiresan pursued research training in cardiovascular genetics through a combined experience at the Framingham Heart Study and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. In 2008, he joined the research faculties of the MGH Cardiovascular Research Center and the MGH Center for Human Genetic Research.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Physician-in-Chief, Dept of Med, MGH
    Physician-in-Chief, Dept of Med, MGH
    Katrina Armstrong, MD, MSCE, is Professor of Clinical Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Physician-in-Chief, Department of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Dr. Armstrong is a graduate of Yale University and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She was a resident and chief resident in Medicine at Johns Hopkins and completed a general internal medicine fellowship and Masters of Science in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1998, she joined the faculty at Penn and became Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine in 2008. At Penn, she also served as Associate Director of the Abramson Cancer Center and Co-Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. In April of 2013, she was appointed as physician-in-chief of the MGH Department of Medicine. Dr. Armstrong is an internationally recognized investigator in the areas of medical decision making, quality of care, and cancer prevention and outcomes. For her work, she received the Outstanding Junior Investigator of the Year Award from the Society of General Internal Medicine, the Alice Hersh Award from Academy Health, election to the American Society of Clinical and the Outstanding Investigator Award from the American Federation of Medical Research. Her research program has received extensive federal funding, including awards from the National Cancer Institute, the National Human Genome Research Institute, American Cancer Society, Department of Defense and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Most recently, she is leading the NCI funded Center for Innovation in Personalized Screening, part of the national PROSPR network. She has over 130 peer-reviewed articles in highly regarded journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA and the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Dr. Armstrong is an actively practicing general internist. She has a longitudinal primary care practice as well as serving as an ambulatory preceptor for the internal medicine residency and an attending on the inpatient general medicine service. Dr. Armstrong co-developed the course on clinical decision making for the Penn undergraduate medical curriculum and founded the Masters program in Health Policy Research at Penn for which she has received multiple teaching awards.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Genetics
    Professor of Genetics and Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill
    Professor of Genetics and Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill
    James P. Evans, MD, PhD, is the Bryson Distinguished Professor of Genetics and Medicine at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He directs Adult and Cancer Genetics Services and is clinically active in both Medical Genetics and General Medicine. After obtaining his MD and PhD from the University of Kansas he served as Intern, Resident and Chief Resident of Internal Medicine at The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and then trained in Medical Genetics at The University of Washington in Seattle. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Medical Genetics and in Molecular Diagnostics. Dr. Evans's research interests focus primarily on the applications of next generation genomic analytic technologies in Medicine and broad issues of how genetic information is used and perceived. He has been extensively involved in policy issues both nationally and internationally. He was an advisor to the US Secretary of Health and Human Services on the subject of “Genetics, Health and Society” from 2004-2010 and has been actively involved both nationally and around the world in the education of high court judges about Genetics and scientific matters as described in the New York Times in July of 2008. In 2010 Dr. Evans testified before the US Congress regarding the regulation of genetic testing and has advised the Government Accountability Office on the same subject. In 2011 he was asked to address the US Presidential Commission on Bioethics regarding genetic testing. He has participated in numerous briefings of members of the US Congress regarding matters related to Genetics and participated as faculty and organizer of a United Nations Conference in Concepción, Chile regarding global access to advanced medical technology. Dr. Evans lives in Chapel Hill; he enjoys reading and bicycle riding in his spare time, though not simultaneously.
    • Otolaryngology
    • Quality Improvement
    • Technology, Innovation and Education
    • Endoscopic and skull-base surgery
    • Allergy management and treatment
    • Clinical outcomes research
    Medical & Scientific Advisory Board Member of Global Genes
    Medical & Scientific Advisory Board Member of Global Genes
    • Physician/Surgeon at Cambridge Hospital, Harvard Medical School
    Ayesha is a Board Certified ENT surgeon with over 10 years of experience in the healthcare industry. She recently completed her MBA at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the Sloan Fellows Program - a program focused on innovation and global leadership. Ayesha is a systems thinker and a healthcare innovation enthusiast. While at Sloan, Ayesha joined MIT H@cking Medicine to help promote disruptive thinking in healthcare. Prior to Sloan, Ayesha served on several Boards for medical organizations, performed cutting edge basic science and clinical research in the areas of inflammation and mucociliary clearance. She is a Medical & Scientific Board Member of Global Genes. As a practicing clinician, understands the healthcare change process and the need to foster cross-disciplinary engagement. She is involved with an innovative venture -Collective Healthtech - that is innovating the way hospitals collaborate on a global level. Ayesha is deeply committed to her passion of promoting girls to study scientific fields as well as technology and engineering. During her time at MIT, she engaged in several educational technology initiatives including a project in Peter Senge's Leadership Lab at MIT Sloan. Through this, she was part of a project at Porto Seguro School in Sao Paulo, Brazil that worked on the integration of technology in education using a systems thinking approach to encourage student-centered learning. @ayeshakhalidmd @mithackmed
    • Cardiovascular Disease
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Molecular Genetics
    Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    • Chief Scientific Offficer, Analytical Technologies at Thermo Fisher Scientific
    Klaus Lindpaintner, MD, MPH, FACP serves as Chief Scientific Officer at Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world's leading provider of analytical instruments, reagents, and services, where he is spearheading efforts to drive innovation with regard to both content and process. Previously, he held senior positions at Hoffman-La Roche, where he spearheaded the company's efforts in personalized health care and was responsible for the respective activities in translational research that have rebranded the company's image; at SDIX, a specialty-antibody-focused biotechnology company; and on the faculty of Harvard Medical School. Klaus has co-authored more than 250 scientific papers, and holds honorary and adjunct professorships at several academic institutions. He serves on numerous boards, working groups, and advisory panels for trade organizations, regulatory authorities, and non-governmental organizations on issues related to the successful implementation and leverage of novel technologies in health care and industrial applications, as well as on the ethical and societal impact of these technologies. Klaus graduated from Innsbruck University Medical School with a degree in medicine, and from Harvard University with a degree in public health. He pursued post-graduate training and specialization in internal medicine, cardiology, and clinical and molecular genetics in the US and Germany, and is a Diplomate of the Boards in these specialties.
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Medical Genetics
    Professor & Chief Maternal-Fetal Medicine Medicine, UF ObGyn
    Professor & Chief Maternal-Fetal Medicine Medicine, UF ObGyn
    Dr. Tony Gregg joined the University of Florida Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology as Professor, and Chief, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine in June 2011. He is the Director of Obstetrics for UF Health. He also serves as Director of the UF Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellowship Training Program. He received formal medical training at Loyola University and Loyola Foster McGaw Hospital (medical school and residency), the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (maternal fetal medicine) and Baylor College of Medicine (medical genetics). Tony is certified by the American Board of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics. He is certified to practice in general obstetrics and gynecology, maternal fetal medicine and medical genetics. His motivation towards genetics training was to better understand maternal medical complications of pregnancy, to this end he pursued mouse modeling of preeclampsia. He has had research funding by private organizations and foundations as well as small NIH awards. He has held a six year positions as the treasurer of the Perinatal Research Society and as a member of the Board of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). He is a past Chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Genetics and he is currently a liaison to this Committee for the ACMG. He is interested in the implementation of next generation sequencing technology into prenatal care. His focus is technology aimed at detecting chromosome abnormalities (NIPS) and expanded carrier screening.
    • Clinical Biochemical Genetics
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    Ass. Professor of Pediatrics, Div. Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Columbia University
    Ass. Professor of Pediatrics, Div. Clinical Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Columbia University
    • Attending Div. Clin. Genetics; Ass. Prof. Pediatrics at Columbia University in the City of New York
    Uta Lichter-Konecki, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Clinical Genetics in the Department of Pediatrics at Columbia University. Dr. Lichter-Konecki specializes in inborn errors of metabolism/inherited metabolic disease, PKU/hyperphenylalaninemia and urea cycle disorders, newborn screening follow-up, and genetic and genomic medicine. Dr. Lichte-Konecki's main interest has is the pathophysiology of the brain damage that occurs in many patients with inborn errors of metabolism especially urea cycle disorders and phenylketonuria and developing neuroprotective therapies for these conditions. Other research interests are renal Fanconi syndrome and lysosomal membrane proteins. Dr. Lichter-Konecki has initiated a study regarding the efficacy of hypothermia treatment in hyperammonemic encephalopathy. She has published over 70 peer reviewed articles and chapters. Dr. Lichter-Konecki is a member of the Therapeutics Committee of the American College of Medical Genetics and is a member of the Scientified Advisory Board of the National PKU Alliance.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    Healthcare Consultant at Maine Medical Center
    Healthcare Consultant at Maine Medical Center
    Tom Brewster, MD, is a Healthcare Consultant at Maine Medical Center Physician Hospital Organization, where he works on health care delivery, payment reform, and genomic medicine. He is also on the Joint Advisory Committee of the Maine Genetics and Newborn Screening Program and Board of Directors of the New England Regional Genetics Group. Prior to the last 3 years, Dr. Brewster was an Attending Physician at Maine Medical Center for 33 years, where he was the Director of the Metabolism Program. Dr. Brewster received his medical school training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He went on to complete a pediatric residency at the University of Pennsylvania Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Finally, he completed his Genetics and Metabolism Fellowship at the Harvard-affiliated Boston Children's Hospital. He is an Emeritus Fellow of the American College of Genetics and Genomics and FAAP.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    Assist. Prof. Clinical Medicine, Human & Molecular Genetics, Nationwide Children's Hospital
    Assist. Prof. Clinical Medicine, Human & Molecular Genetics, Nationwide Children's Hospital
    Dr. Murugu Manickam received his Bachelor of Arts (with honors) from Case Western Reserve University and his Medical Degree from The Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin, Ireland (with honors). He completed an Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency in at MetroHealth Hospital (Case Western School of Medicine) and a Clinical Genetics residency at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Manickam is a Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine (2007) and the American Board of Medical Genetics (2009). He has nearly completed a Masters of Public Health in Public Health Leadership from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Dr. Manickam was a visiting scholar/externship with NHGRI and was selected for a NIH training program in Comparative Effectiveness Research through the Ohio State School of Public Health. Dr. Manickam is currently an Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine in the Division of Human and Molecular Genetics (Department of Pediatrics) at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. He also has a joint appointment in the Division of Human Genetics in the Department of Internal Medicine at The Ohio State University and the James Cancer Hospital. At Nationwide Children’s Hospital Dr. Manickam provides clinical genetic services with the Genetics Center, as well as in several outreach clinics. At the Ohio State University he is involved in the Medical Genetics Program, Adult Down syndrome Clinic. He also works closely with Nisonger Center in developing adults with disabilities programs. In addition to developing and directing a P4 Medicine Summer Intensive course for 2nd year medical students, he is a member of the College of Medicine’s curriculum development team. Dr. Manickam is a co-PI for the OSU/Coriell Institute collaborative Personalized Medicine study and authored several articles in the area of genomics. He is a member of the Pharmacogenomics Research Network, EPIC genomics working group and the CDC Working Group on Family History/Electronic Medical Record.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Pediatrics
    • Pediatrics - Child Neurology
    Chair, Department of Genetic, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Chair, Department of Genetic, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD, is the Wayne H. and Sara Crews Finley Chair in Medical Genetics, Professor and Chair of the Department of Genetics, Director of the Heflin Center for Genomic Sciences at UAB, and Co-Director of the UAB-Hudson Alpha Center for Genomic Medicine. He is a medical geneticist, pediatrician, and child neurologist, certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics (clinical genetics, clinical cytogenetics, clinical molecular genetics), American Board of Pediatrics, and American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (child neurology). Dr. Korf is the past president of the Association of Professors of Human and Medical Genetics, past president of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, and current president of the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine. He has served on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute at the NIH. His major research interests are molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders and the natural history, genetics, and treatment of neurofibromatosis. He serves as principal investigator of the Department of Defense funded Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium. He is co-author of Human Genetics and Genomics (medical student textbook, now in fourth edition), Medical Genetics at a Glance (medical student textbook, now in third edition), Emery and Rimoin’s Principles and Practice of Medical Genetics (now in 6th edition), and Current Protocols in Human Genetics.
    • Clinical Genetics (MD)
    • Clinical Molecular Genetics
    • Pediatrics
    Medical Director at Claritas Genomics
    Medical Director at Claritas Genomics
    David T. Miller, MD, PhD, is a Medical Geneticist at Boston Children's Hospital, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and Medical Director at Claritas Genomics, a provider of genomic testing services. Dr. Miller’s experience as a clinician who orders genetic tests and provides results directly to patients, combined with expertise in developing and performing laboratory diagnostic assays, provides him with a unique perspective on clinical genetic testing. His academic work has focused on discovery of new genetic syndromes through genetic testing, demonstrating the value and utility of clinical genetic testing, and the development of best practices for clinical genetic testing. He received his MD and PhD degrees from Washington University in St. Louis, completed a residency in Pediatrics at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and residency/fellowship in Medical Genetics and Clinical Molecular Genetics at Harvard Medical School. He is board-certified in Pediatrics, Clinical Genetics, and Clinical Molecular Genetics.