Experts
    • Neurology - Movement Disorders
    • Adelaide Lackner Professor and Chair of Neurology at McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida

    Michael S. Okun, MD, is Professor and Chairman, University of Florida Department of Neurology, and Co-Director, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute, Gainesville. He also holds the Adelaide Lackner Professorship in Neurology at the University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute. He is dedicated to the interdisciplinary care concept. Since his appointment as the National Medical Director for the Parkinson's Foundation in 2006, he has worked with the international Parkinson's Foundation centers of excellence to help foster the best possible environments for care and research. He runs the online international “Ask the Expert” forums on the Parkinson's Foundation website. He is also the Medical Advisor for Tyler’s Hope for a Dystonia Cure and Co-Director of the Medical Advisory Board for the Tourette Syndrome Association. Dr. Okun’s research interests include nonmotor basal ganglia brain features and the cognitive, behavioral, and mood effects of deep-brain stimulation. He has published more than 400 peer-reviewed articles, is a published poet (Lessons From the Bedside, 1995), and has served as a reviewer for more than 25 major medical journals. He authored the number-one best-selling book on Parkinson disease on Amazon, Parkinson’s Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life, which has been translated into 20 languages. He is an international speaker on Parkinson disease, DBS, and movement disorders. Dr. Okun is an associate editor for JAMA Neurology.

    • Neurology
    • Professor of Neurology at UCSF

    Peter Goadsby is Professor of Neurology at King’s College, London; Professor of Neurology in the Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco; and Director of the NIHR-Wellcoem Trust King's Clinical Research Facility. He obtained his medical degree and training at the University of New South Wales, Australia. His neurology training was done under the supervision of Professor James W. Lance in Sydney. After postdoctoral work in New York with Don Reis at Cornell, with Jacques Seylaz in Paris, and post-graduate neurology training at Queen Square in London working with late Professors C. David Marsden and W. Ian McDonald, he returned to the University of New South Wales, and the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, as a consultant neurologist and was promoted to Associate Professor. He was appointed a Wellcome Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Neurology, University College London, in 1995, and this was renewed in 2000. He was Professor of Clinical Neurology and Honorary Consultant Neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, and the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond St., London. His major research interests are the basic mechanisms of head pain in both experimental settings and in the clinical context of headache.

    • Neurology
    Director of the programme of   Neurology, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá/Universidad El Bosque
    Director of the programme of   Neurology, Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá/Universidad El Bosque
    • Professor Programme of Neurology at Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá

    Jaime Toro, MD, is Professor and Director of the Programme of Neurology at the Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá/Universidad El Bosque and Professor of Neurology at the Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia. His clinical and research work focuses on multiple sclerosis, and he has edited two major neurology textbooks. He received his training in general neurology in his native country of Colombia and in neurophysiology in Washington, D.C. From 1986 to 1988, he was President of the Colombian Neurological Association. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, and a member of the editorial board of Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. Dr. Toro has served on the NEJM Journal Watch Neurology board since the publication’s launch in 1999.