Ask the Experts: Critical Care

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Experts
    • Anesthesiology
    • Critical Care Medicine

    Jed Wolpaw MD, M.Ed is an Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine and residency program director for the 80 resident training program. He subspecializes in critical care and currently attends in the Cardiac Surgical ICU, the general surgical ICU, and in the general adult ORs. Jed graduated magna cum laude with a degree in History from Brown University. He then received a Masters degree in Education at Harvard Graduate School of Education and taught high school history for two years. Subsequently he transitioned to medicine, receiving his medical degree from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) school of medicine where he graduated AOA and was chosen to be the student commencement speaker. He stayed at UCSF to complete his Anesthesia residency. He then came to Johns Hopkins for a fellowship in Critical Care Medicine which he completed in June 2015. After completing his fellowship Dr. Wolpaw joined the faculty as an assistant professor. In addition to running the residency program he co-runs both the Anesthesiology clerkship and the ICU clerkship. He is the founder and host of Anesthesia and Critical Care Reviews and Commentary (ACCRAC), a podcast focusing on board review material for anesthesia residents as well as interesting topics in anesthesia and critical care which is downloaded by more than 15,000 people each month. At the end of his first year on faculty Dr. Wolpaw was awarded the Charles Beattie Teacher of the Year award, the most prestigious teaching award given by the department each year. The following year he was awarded the resident advocacy award. Dr. Wolpaw's research interests include resident well-being, alternative methods of teaching and learning, and improving the way we teach our trainees.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Anesthesiology
    • Program Director, Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine Fellowship at University of California at San Francisco

    Dr. Thornton practices cardiothoracic anesthesiology and critical care medicine at UCSF. He is dedicated to improving the quality of care that patients receive while in the ICU and helping patients and families navigate the often confusing environment that the modern ICU has become. He is deeply committed to education and serves as the Program Director for UCSF's Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine Fellowship program and is actively involved in teaching UCSF medical students, residents, and fellows in a variety of clinical and non-clinical environments. Additionally, he serves as the Director of Resident Wellness Programs and is leading the implementation of a comprehensive wellness curriculum focused on enhancing resilience.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Anesthesiology
    • Edward Lowenstein Professor and Chair in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School

    Daniel Talmor, M.D., M.P.H., is chair of the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the Edward Lowenstein professor of anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School.  Prior to becoming chair, Dr. Talmor was the vice chair for Critical Care Medicine at BIDMC.

     

    Dr. Talmor received his medical degree from Ben Gurion University in Beer-Sheva, Israel.  He followed this with a residency in anesthesia  and in 1999 he came to BIDMC, where he completed fellowships in critical care medicine and cardiac anesthesia.  He then earned his Master’s in Public Health from Harvard School of Public Health. His research interests are centered on the early identification and treatment of critically ill patients, with a particular focus on the optimal delivery of mechanical ventilation. 

     

    Dr. Talmor currently serves as the principal investigator (PI) on two National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-funded studies, one of which is a phase 2 clinical trial testing a novel mode of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute lung injury.  The other is the NHLBI network for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Lung Injury. He is also the principal investigator on a large grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation aimed at redesigning the way care is delivered in the Intensive Care Unit using principles of systems engineering.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Anesthesiology
    • Program Director, Critical Care-Anesthesiology Fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital

    Dr. Edward Bittner is an anesthesiologist and critical care physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he serves as Program Director for the Critical Care Medicine Fellowship and Associate Director of the Surgical Intensive Care Unit. He is an Associate Professor of Anesthesiology at Harvard Medical School. Dr Bittner earned his PhD in biostatistics from Tulane University, medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and a master's degree in Medical Education from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Anesthesiology and Fellowships in Cardiac and Critical Care Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Bittner has broad academic and research interests that combine his background in biostatistics and education with his clinical expertise of anesthesiology and critical care. He has published over 150 original articles, reviews, chapters, and editorials and edited nine books in the fields of anesthesiology and critical care medicine. Dr. Bittner is a fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the American College of Epidemiology.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Anesthesiology
    • Medical Director, Respiratory Care at Massachusetts General Hospital

    After his medical school at the University of Milan, Dr. Berra spent three years under the mentorship of Dr. Theodor Kolobow in a research laboratory at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD). From 2006-2011 he completed his residency in Anesthesia and fellowship in Critical Care both at the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at MGH. Since 2011 he is a staff anesthesiologist and intensivist and a member of Dr. Warren Zapol's MGH Anesthesia Center for Critical Care Research. His current patient care activities are focused on caring for critically ill patients and their families. His primary research and academic interests involve translational research to improve diagnosis, treatment and care of critically ill patients with cardio-pulmonary failure or severe infections

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Nephrology
    • critical care medicine
    • Clinical Informatics
    • Clinical nephrology
    Clinician and Scientist with Joint Appointment in the Divisions of Nephrology and Hypertension & Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Mayo Clinic
    Clinician and Scientist with Joint Appointment in the Divisions of Nephrology and Hypertension & Pulmonary and Critical...
    • Clinician and Scientist with Joint Appointment in the Divisions of Nephrology and Hypertension & Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Mayo Clinic

    I am a clinician and scientist with joint appointment in the Divisions of Nephrology and Hypertension and Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. A specific research interest of mine is acute kidney injury (AKI) where I have authored more than 100 manuscripts, several book chapters and given lectures on the national and international stages. In particular, I led the effort to discover and validate two novel biomarkers of acute kidney injury (TIMP2 and IGFBP7) in critically ill patients. I also used my expertise with informatics to create an electronic surveillance tool for early detection of AKI. I have collaborated in development and validation novel diagnostic tools for AKI prediction and detection including ultrasound elastography. Finally, I am involved in numerous multicenter, multinational trials, which seek to determine optimal methods to identify and treat AKI including the use of renal replacement therapy.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Pain Medicine
    Anesthetist-in-Chief in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital
    Anesthetist-in-Chief in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Anesthetist-in-Chief in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital

    Jeanine Wiener-Kronish M.D. is the Anesthetist-in-Chief in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She received her B.A. in Psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Weiner-Kronish then received her M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco. Boarded in internal medicine, pulmonary, critical care and anesthesiology

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Medical Education
    • Critical Care and Perioperative Ultrasound
    • Care of the Geriatric Surgical Patient
    • End of Life Care in the ICU
    • Advanced Care Planning
    Associate Program Director, Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Program, University of California, San Francisco
    Associate Program Director, Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Program, University of California, San Francisco
    • Assistant Clinical Professor at University of California, San Francisco

    Anne Donovan, MD, is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the departments of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She is involved in education at both the residency and fellowship levels as the Associate Program Director of the Anesthesia Critical Care Medicine Fellowship program; Director of the Critical Care Scholars, UCSF's innovative combined anesthesia residency and ICU fellowship track; and ICU rotation director. Her clinical, QI, and research interests include communication with seriously ill patients, surgical decision-making and risk stratification, care of the geriatric surgical patient, role of the anesthesiologist throughout the perioperative continuum, and point of care ultrasound. She completed both residency and fellowship at UCSF.

    • Cardiovascular Disease
    • Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology
    Director of Electrophysiology Laboratory at University of Pennsylvania
    Director of Electrophysiology Laboratory at University of Pennsylvania

     

    Francis Marchlinski MD FACC, FAHA, FHRS. Dr. Marchlinski is the Richard T and Angela Clark President’s Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Director of Electrophysiology, University of Pennsylvania Health Care System and the Director of the Electrophysiology Laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.  Dr. Marchlinski is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He completed his postdoctoral internal medicine residency and cardiology/electrophysiology fellowship training at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.   For over thirty years Dr. Marchlinski has remained at the cutting edge of cardiac rhythm management. He has authored or co-authored over 400 original scientific articles and over 150 book chapters/reviews/editorials on a variety of topics in cardiac electrophysiology. His EP team at Penn has worked to successfully improve localizing and ablation techniques for the treatment of both atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia and optimize device therapy for treating heart failure and preventing sudden cardiac death.  Dr. Marchlinski has served on the International Heart Rhythm Society Committee to establish guidelines for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia using catheter ablation techniques. He has been the recipient of the Luigi Mastroianni Clinical Innovator Award, the Venice Arrhythmia Distinguished Scientist Award and the ACTS Distinguished Investigator Award – Career Achievement –Translation from Early Clinical Use to Applicability for Widespread Clinical Practice.  Dr. Marchlinski is on the editorial board of ‘Circulation, Arrhythmias and Electrophysiology’, ‘American Journal of Cardiology, ‘Heart Rhythm Journal’, ‘Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology’, ‘Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology’ and ‘JACC- Electrophysiology’ and is the Arrhythmia Section Editor for ‘Journal of the American College of Cardiology’. Dr. Marchlinski has organized and directed multiple fellowship training courses, regional and International EP symposia and has received numerous teaching awards at the University of Pennsylvania.   

     

     

     

    • Thoracic and Cardiac Surgery
    • General Surgery
    • General, Trauma and Critical Care surgeon at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania & serves as the Section Chief of Surgical Critical Care at Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    Dr. Kaplan is a general, trauma and critical care surgeon at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania who serves as the Section Chief of Surgical Critical Care at the Corporal Michael J Crescenz VA Medical Center in Philadelphia, PA. He received a BA in Biology with honors from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, PA in 1984 and his MD from Rutgers Medical School in Piscataway, NJ in 1988. Surgical residency was complete at the Medical College of PA (MCP; 1988-1995) with two years spent in basic research into cardiac bioenergetics and ischemic preconditioning (1991-1993). Dr. Kaplan completed a Fellowship in Surgical Critical Care at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (1996-1997) and then joined the faculty at MCP and Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia, PA where he directed the SICU and the Surgical Critical Care (SCC) fellowship. Seven years later he was recruited to Yale University to establish an Emergency General Surgery service for the Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care. Having done so he then resumed leadership in the Yale-New Haven Hospital ICU and the SCC and Acute Care Surgery fellowships. Eleven years after that, he was recruited back to Philadelphia into his current roles. Dr. Kaplan serves in several professional societies in leadership roles (Society of Critical Care Medicine, Surgical Infection Society), and on multiple editorial boards including the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Surgical Infections and reviews for a host of others. A durable interest in Tactical Emergency Medical Services is underscored by serving for years as a surgeon embedded in a regional SWAT team. Research interests span models of critical care, unmeasured ion impact in acid-base balance, acute kidney injury, surgical infection, Airway Pressure Release Ventilation, and Tactical Emergency Medical Services.

    • Internal Medicine
    • Pulmonary Disease
    • Research Scientist at Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research

    Vincent Liu, MD, MS, is a research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research. Dr. Liu is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania and his medical degree from New York University. He completed his residency training at New York University Hospitals (Bellevue) and a chief residency at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He also completed a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship, as well as received a MS in health services research, at Stanford University. His research focuses on high-intensity medical care with a special interest in critical care research, advanced lung disease, and solid organ transplantation. He is interested in improving the long-term efficacy and efficiency of high-intensity care as well as understanding the intersection between hospital care and health information technology.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Associate Chief of Academic Affairs & Director of Critical Care Research in the Division of Critical Care Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center

    Dr. Gong is the Associate Chief of Academic Affairs and Director of Critical Care Research in the Division of Critical Care Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center and Professor in Medicine and Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. After receiving an engineering degree at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Gong went on to earn a medical degree at the Yale University School of Medicine. She then completed her postdoctoral training at the Beth Israel Hospital in medicine and at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in the Harvard Combined Program in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. She also studied at the Harvard School of Public Health, receiving her Master’s degree in Epidemiology. Prior to coming to Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, she was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She joined the Einstein/Montefiore faculty in July 2009. Dr. Gong is recognized nationally and internationally for her expertise in critical care research. A model clinician-researcher, her scientific projects influence her clinical care, and her patients influence her research. Her overall research focus has been on the prediction and prevention of acute critical illness and their complications. Continuously funded by the NIH for over 15 years for her research, her current research range from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to prevention of delirium, treatment of severe influenza, big data and predictive analytics to identify patients at risk for respiratory failure or clinical deterioration, and effective clinical decision support. An award-winning educator, Dr. Gong has received the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Health Disparity Scholar Award and the Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award.

    • General Surgery

    Dr. Park’s ongoing clinical and research interest is in the prevention and support of acute lung injury, particularly severe hypoxic respiratory failure in critically ill and injured patients. She is the Co-Principal Investigator of the Michigan Center for the NIH/NHLBI PETAL Network and an investigator with the Society of Critical Care Medicine Discovery Network. She has served as Site Principal investigator for several national multicenter clinical trials, and has participated as a member of the American Association for Surgery of Trauma Multi Institutional Trials and Critical Care Committees, Her published work has focused on interventional and observational trials in lung injury prevention, ventilator strategies, extracorporeal support, trauma surgery and surgical critical care. She has presented nationally and internationally on lung injury prevention, extracorporeal support in severe influenza and advanced ventilator strategies. Dr. Park holds board certification in General Surgery and Surgical Critical Care and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and the American College of Critical Care Medicine. She serves on the Steering Committees for the PETAL (CoChair, Natural History Committee) and Discovery (Chair, Ancillary Studies/Publication Committee) networks, on the Critical Care Committee for the American Association for Surgery of Trauma and in the Designated Surgery Seat on Council for the Society of Critical Care Medicine. She is the Program Director for the University of Michigan Surgical Critical Care Fellowship Program. Dr. Park has been a recipient of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Presidential Citation and Annual Scientific Awards.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology
    • Cardiovascular Disease
    • Medical Director of the UNC Mechanical Heart Program, Medical Director of the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) & Medical Director of the Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CVT-ICU) & Critical Care Service at UNC Center for Heart and Vascular Care

    Jason N. Katz MD MHS is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Divisions of Cardiology and Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine at UNC Center for Heart and Vascular Care. He received his MD from The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and his MHS from National Institutes of Health/Duke University. Dr. Katz is also the UNC Healthcare System Director for Cardiovascular Critical Care, Mechanical Circulatory Support, & the Cardiogenic Shock Program. He also serves as medical director of the UNC Mechanical Heart Program, the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) and the Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CVT-ICU) & Critical Care Service.