Discussants
    • Infectious Disease
    • Internal Medicine
    Associate Editor at NEJM, Prof of Immunology & ID
    Associate Editor at NEJM, Prof of Immunology & ID
    • Irene Heinz Given Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health
    Eric J. Rubin, M.D., Ph.D., is an associate editor at the New England Journal of Medicine. He is the Irene Heinz Given Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard School of Public Health. Despite over a century of research, Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the leading causes of infectious death in the world. While treatments are available, they are difficult to administer for the extended times required for cure and, therefore, are far from optimal. Dr. Eric Rubin's lab studies the factors required for mycobacteria to survive and grow, both under artificial conditions and during model infections. They have devised a number of genetic approaches to identifying cellular consittuents required for optimal growth and to study individual essential genes and their products. They continue to explore basic mycobacterial cell biology, including cell division, translation and protein turnover, and the interface between the pathogen and its host.
    • Infectious Disease
    • Internal Medicine
    Deputy Editor at NEJM, Director of Clinical Research in ID at BWH
    Deputy Editor at NEJM, Director of Clinical Research in ID at BWH
    Lindsey R. Baden, M.D., is deputy editor at the New England Journal of Medicine. Lindsey R. Baden is the Director of Clinical Research in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, as well as the Director of Infectious Diseases at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He also holds the appointment of Associate Professor at the Harvard Medical School, all in Boston, Massachusetts. He received his medical school training at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, followed by a residency in Internal Medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He completed a Fellowship at the Beth Israel and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Infectious Diseases and is board certified in Infectious Diseases and Internal Medicine. His current research interests focus on the impact of infection in the immunocompromised host (primarily recipients of hematopoietic stem-cell transplants).