Experts
    • Pulmonary Disease
    • Medical Education
    Executive Director, Shapiro Institute for Education and Research, BIDMC
    Executive Director, Shapiro Institute for Education and Research, BIDMC
    Richard M. Schwartzstein, MD, Ellen and Melvin Gordon Professor of Medicine and Medical Education at Harvard Medical School, is Associate Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) where he directs one of only two national centers for the study and treatment of dyspnea (shortness of breath). The Asthma and Dyspnea Center at BIDMC specializes in the evaluation of patients with dyspnea of unclear etiology or breathlessness seemingly out of proportion to the patient’s known pulmonary problems. Dr. Schwartzstein has been an active clinical educator and researcher since he came to the HMS faculty over 20 years ago. He completed a Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education, for which he was named the Kay Senior Fellow. He is course director of Integrated Human Physiology in the first year curriculum, and he developed the Principal Clinical Experience program at BIDMC for third-year students. His textbook, “Respiratory Physiology: A Clinical Approach,” received a national award for its interactive style. Dr. Schwartzstein has been the Executive Director of the Shapiro Institute for Education and Research and Vice President for Education at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center since 2004. In 2009, Dr. Schwartzstein was named Director of the HMS Academy for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation. His work in the Academy focuses on the development of pedagogical approaches to enhance analytical reasoning, techniques to maximize the benefits of small group teaching, and assessment of the role of simulation in medical education.
    • Critical Care Medicine
    Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education at UC San Diego School of Medicine
    Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education at UC San Diego School of Medicine
    • Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education at UC San Diego School of Medicine

    A native of the Chicago area, Dr. Mandel received his Bachelor of Arts in History from Brown University in 1986, and earned his Doctorate in Medicine from Baylor College of Medicine in 1991. He served as Intern, Resident, and Chief Resident in Internal Medicine at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, and completed fellowship training in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. After joining the faculty of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Mandel served as Director of the Internal Medicine Training Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and established the hospital’s Pulmonary Hypertension Center. In 2001, he joined the faculty of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, where he served as Assistant Dean in the Office of Student Affairs and Curriculum, and as Co-Director of the University of Iowa Pulmonary Hypertension Program. He also directed courses in physiology and in medical humanities. In 2006, he was appointed Associate Dean of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine with responsibility for undergraduate medical education. In that position, he has spearheaded a comprehensive review and successful redesign of its medical school curriculum and learning environment. He also remains clinically active as part of UCSD’s Pulmonary Vascular, Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia, and Critical Care Medicine services. Dr. Mandel has contributed publications related to medical education and to pulmonary vascular disease. He has co-authored two books, one on pulmonary vascular disease and another on general pulmonary medicine. He lives in La Jolla, California with his spouse, Meg Leopold Mandel, and their two children.

    • Critical Care Medicine
    Chairman of the Education Institute at Cleveland Clinic
    Chairman of the Education Institute at Cleveland Clinic

    Dr. Stoller is a pulmonary/critical care physician and Chairman of the Education Institute at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. He also serves as a member of the Respiratory Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, where he also served previously as the Vice Chairman of Medicine, Head of the Section of Respiratory Therapy, and as Executive Director of Physician Leadership Development. He holds the Jean Wall Bennett Professorship of Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University and the Samson Global leadership Academy Endowed Chair and has a secondary appointment as Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Weatherhead School of Management of Case Western Reserve University. He also serves as Honorary Visiting Professor at Cass School of Business, City, University of London (UK). Dr. Stoller began his career after receiving his medical degree from Yale University School of Medicine in 1979 and went on to complete an internship and residency at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1982, he became a Fellow in Pulmonary Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a year later accepted a Fellowship at Yale University School of Medicine in Pulmonary Medicine and as a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar in Clinical Epidemiology. After completing his fellowship at Yale, he undertook a Fellowship in Critical Care Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Subsequently, he has completed a Masters Degree in Organizational Development and Analysis at the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University. He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, and in Critical Care Medicine.

    • Pediatrics

    Charles Prober, MD is the Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education and Founding Executive Director of the Stanford Center for Health Education. He is a Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology. He is an expert in pediatric infectious diseases with an academic career focused on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of infections in children. Some of his seminal work has resulted in the improvement of international blood transfusion practices through the selection of CMV negative donors for immunocompromised hosts; the optimal duration of antibiotic therapy for serious bacterial infections, including osteomyelitis and meningitis; the use of antiviral agents in the management of serious herpes virus infections; and the standardization of care in the management of pregnant women with HSV infections. Prober has published extensively in peer-reviewed subspecialty, specialty, and general medical journals and he is editor of Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, one of the major textbooks in the field of pediatric infectious diseases. Dr. Prober has been involved in medical education throughout his career. He has directed a number of undergraduate and graduate student courses in the classroom and at the bedside, served as Associate Chair for Education for the Department of Pediatrics, and lectured locally, nationally, and internationally on infectious diseases and medical education. He served as Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education at Stanford from 2007-2017 and in that role he worked diligently to create a more diverse and supportive educational environment for our students and graduate medical trainees. Some of the initiatives developed under his leadership included: the highly successful Educators-4- CARE (E4C) program, the Office of Medical Student Wellness, expansion of combined degree programs, the creation of the Stanford Society for Physician Scholars for residents and fellows, the use of Multi-Mini Interviews as part of our medical school admissions process, and the creation of our Teaching and Mentoring Academy. In addition to being a national advocate for enhancing the richness of interactions between faculty and students in medical education, Charles has advocated for a more measured approach to the use of national examination scores in the selection of residents, working with the leadership of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). Prober is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the 2016 Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Award for Outstanding and Innovative Contributions to Medical Education.

    • Internal Medicine

    Dr. David H. Roberts is the Steven P. Simcox, Patrick A. Clifford, and James H. Higby Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), and the inaugural Dean for External Education at HMS. David is developing and implementing innovative educational programs for learners around the globe leveraging new technologies and advances in learning sciences. David and his team have created a paradigm-shifting new online learning platform called HMX, begun the transformation of Harvard Health Publications to digital and multi-media publishing, and merged and expanded the HMS Global and Continuing Medical Education programs. Additionally, David and his colleagues have created a novel set of executive education programs for business leaders to learn about actual delivery of modern healthcare. David is currently in the second class of the Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship. Since 2001, David has been a pulmonary and critical care physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and an award-winning educator of medical students, residents, fellows and faculty. David previously directed both HMS preclinical courses and the BIDMC Principal Clinical Experience. He is both a member and the former associate director of the faculty development-focused Academy at HMS. David earned his bachelor’s degree in biochemistry, graduating summa cum laude, from Cornell University. He went on to complete medical training at HMS, internal medicine training at Massachusetts General Hospital, and a pulmonary and critical care fellowship in the Harvard Combined Program.

    • Anatomic and Clinical Pathology
    • Medical Education
    Head of Problem-Based Learning curriculum at UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program
    Head of Problem-Based Learning curriculum at UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program

    Dr. Valbuena is Head of Problem-Based Learning Curriculum at the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program (JMP). He completed a combined program consisting of residency in Pathology and PhD in Experimental Pathology in Texas. His passion for education was ignited by leading the basic science curriculum design of a new medical school in Colombia and subsequently through the development of a new PhD program in translational medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch. This program was recognized in 2012 with an Award for Innovations in Research Training and Education from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In 2015, Dr. Valbuena moved to the Bay Area and, after a successful career in infectious diseases research, decided to completely focus his professional career on Medical Education. In addition to his duties at the JMP, he is also a graduate student in the Doctoral program in Health Professions Education run in collaboration between UCSF and Utrecht University Medical Center in the Netherlands. His research interests include the conceptualization and operationalization of inquiry in medical education and its connection to the process of integration between the basic sciences and clinical sciences. He hopes that his research findings will lead to the design of novel learning opportunities for a new generation of physicians who can respond to the challenges of modern medicine and our society.

    Teaching Philosophy: I believe that educational processes, including curriculum planning, design of instructional activities, and evaluation, should be guided by scientific evidence. This includes the concept that better learning outcomes will be obtained through: 1) curriculum formulation with authentic performances of the discipline as the guiding element, and 2) attainment of specified competencies in the context of Entrustable Professional Activities as the evaluation parameter. Presently, multiple disciplines, particularly cognitive and educational psychology, pedagogy, and neuroscience, are converging on learning as a central theme; such convergence can support evidence-based education like never before. I also believe that the learning process must be the center of attention of our educational effort; this focus will necessarily affect students and teachers in a positive manner. However, it is not just science and evidence; in teaching and mentoring, it is not likely that the best possible outcomes can be accomplished without the complete investment of the educator’s heart and soul. The teacher is intimately involved in the process as an individual that deeply cares about the students and their development.

     

    • Internal Medicine
    Associate Dean, Assessment; University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine
    Associate Dean, Assessment; University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine

    Karen Hauer is Associate Dean for Competency Assessment and Professional Standards and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She designs and leads the program of assessment in the UCSF School of Medicine Bridges curriculum and directs the School’s medical student coaching program. She is an active researcher in medical education and a research mentor for fellows, residents and students, with a focus on new models of clinical learning in the workplace, competency-based medical education, learner assessment, coaching and remediation. In 2015, she completed a PhD in Medical Education through a joint program with UCSF and the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands. She is a member of the National Board of Medical Examiners and past president of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine national organization. She earned her undergraduate degree at Stanford University, and then completed medical school, internal medicine residency, and chief residency at UCSF. She is a practicing general internist in primary care. She is married and has 3 children.

     

    • Infectious Disease
    • Technology, Innovation and Education
    • Resident Education
    • Infectious Diseases
    • Medical Educaiton
    • Medical Education; Faculty Development; High Value Care Education; Practice Redesign
    Infectious Diseases Specialist and Educator at Columbia University Medical Center
    Infectious Diseases Specialist and Educator at Columbia University Medical Center

    I am an infectious diseases physician passionate about innovative and effective medical education.

    I teach several courses at Columbia University, including the “Microbiology and Infectious Disease” course for first year medical students and the "Ready 4 Residency" course for fourth year medical students.  I believe classroom learning should be engaging, active and learner-centric; therefore, I use various pedagogical tools including Team-based Learning, Just in Time Teaching, Case-based learning, Simulation and the audience response system.  I recently developed the Ready 4 Residency course which is a fully blended, flipped residency readiness course with many innovative features, including online virtual patient-care and virtual rounds.  I am assisted by many talented Columbia faculty and a team of CORE (Columbia Online Resident Educator) volunteers.  I also enjoy training medical residents and infectious diseases fellows in the inpatient setting.