Authors
    • Internal Medicine
    • Neurology
    • Psychiatry

    Mark Rosenberg, MD, MPP, has been president and chief executive officer of The Task Force for Global Health for 15 years. Under Dr. Rosenberg’s leadership, The Task Force has grown to be the fourth largest nonprofit organization in the country with an annual budget of $1.8 billion including in-kind donations of medicines. Central to this success is Dr. Rosenberg’s commitment to collaboration and compassion in global health. He co-authored Real Collaboration: What Global Health Needs to Succeed, which describes a model for global health collaboration that has been successfully applied to address health needs affecting the world’s most impoverished people. Under Dr. Rosenberg’s leadership, The Task Force has been instrumental in providing people in the developing world with greater access to vaccines for influenza, cholera, and other deadly diseases, and medicines for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Dr. Rosenberg also was an influential voice in persuading the United Nations (UN) to recognize road safety as a public health issue, at the time only the second such declaration that the UN had made. Before joining The Task Force, Dr. Rosenberg served 20 years with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where he was the founding director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and reached the rank of assistant surgeon general.

    • Preventive Medicine
    • Epidemiology
    • Biostatistics
    Epidemiologist, Gun Violence Research
    Epidemiologist, Gun Violence Research

    Bindu Kalesan, MPH, PhD, is a clinical epidemiologist and a biostatistician. Dr. Kalesan is interested in clinical and health outcomes research. Her work primarily explores cardiovascular and other long-term consequences in patients undergoing treatment for cardiac diseases, cancer and trauma. She also focuses on public health consequences of firearm violence in the US and the short- and long- term effects of firearm injury survivorship.Currently she is a faculty and the Director of Center for Clinical Translational Epidemiology and Comparative Effectiveness Research, Department of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and works on clinical trials, longitudinal studies and meta-analyses in cardiovascular, diabetes, oncology, infectious diseases and injury/safety research areas. Prior to joining BUSM, she held positions at Columbia University and PPDI. At Columbia University, Dr. Kalesan held the position of Assistant Professor of Surgery and Epidemiology and worked with clinician researchers to provide methodological and statistical support along with developing her independent research of gun violence. At PPDI, she was the Associate Director of Epidemiology and Real World Outcomes and worked with multiple pharmaceutical collaborators as epidemiologist in clinical trials, cohort studies and evidence synthesis.Dr. Kalesan received her PhD in clinical epidemiology and biostatistics from University of Bern, master’s degree in public health and another in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Christian Medical College, India.

    • Public Health and General Preventive Medicine
    Director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center
    Director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center
    • Professor of Health Policy at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    David Hemenway, Ph.D., Professor of Health Policy, is Director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. He formerly spent a week each year at the University of Vermont as a James Marsh Visiting Professor-at-Large. Dr. Hemenway teaches classes on injury and on economics. He has won ten teaching awards at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Hemenway has written widely on injury prevention, including articles on firearms, violence, suicide, child abuse, motor vehicle crashes, fires, falls and fractures. He headed the pilot for the National Violent Death Reporting System, which provides detailed and comparable information on suicide and homicide. In 2012 he was recognized by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention as one of the “twenty most influential injury and violence professionals over the past twenty years.” In articles on insurance, Dr. Hemenway described a general reason why low-risk individuals often buy insurance, and coined the term “propitious selection.” Recent economic studies have focused on empirically determining which goods are more and less positional (e.g., bought largely to “keep up with the Joneses”). An early statistics article, Why Your Classes are Larger than Average, has been anthologized in various mathematical collections. Dr. Hemenway has written five books. Industrywide Voluntary Product Standards (1975) describes the role of voluntary standards and standardization in the U.S. economy. Monitoring and Compliance: the Political Economy of Inspection (1985) describes the importance of inspection processes in ensuring that regulations are followed, and the reasons the system often fails. Prices and Choices (3rd edition) (1993) is a collection of twenty-six of his original essays applying microeconomic theory to everyday life.

    • Internal Medicine
    • Hospital Medicine (Hospitalist)
    General Internist, Massachusetts General Hospital, Research Fellow, Brigham and Women's Hospital 
    General Internist, Massachusetts General Hospital, Research Fellow, Brigham and Women's Hospital 
    • Editorial Fellow at New England Journal of Medicine

    Chana is an outgoing Chief Resident in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and a former editorial fellow at the New England Journal of Medicine.