Experts
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Sarah Little, MD MPH is a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She graduated from Harvard College with a degree in economics, attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco and completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Brigham and Women’s/Massachusetts General Hospital and her fellowship in Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She has a Master’s in Public Health in clinical effectiveness from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Little joined the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 2014. Dr. Little’s research focuses on obstetric quality and outcomes in the U.S. Recent projects have investigated the association between provider volume and mode of delivery and the geographic variation in cesarean delivery rates across the U.S. She is particularly interested in cesarean delivery variation, labor induction practices, and policies and outcomes following a trial of labor after cesarean delivery.
    • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    • Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Medical Director of NICU at University of Utah
    Dr. Bradley A. Yoder is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Neonatology at the University of Utah. He is the Medical Director of the NICU at University Hospital and an Attending Neonatologist at Primary Children’s Hospital and Intermountain Medical Center. Dr. Yoder’s research interests have primarily revolved around pulmonary disorders of the preterm and term neonate, with a particular emphasis on the pathophysiology and management/prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Prior to accepting a position in Utah, he previously directed the Premature Primate Lab at Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research for 10 years. Over the past decade he has been involved at the Steering Committee level and as site or overall PI for several multi-center trials investigating the benefits of a variety of non-invasive approaches for respiratory support of preterm and term infants. Currently Dr. Yoder is the PI for the Utah Center, a 5-site center, in the NICHD Neonatal Research Network. Dr. Yoder has authored or co-authored over 160 publications and book chapters. He has presented regionally, national and internationally and has served as a manuscript reviewer for several journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine.
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Dr. Julian N. Robinson is Chief of Obstetrics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. His clinical practice focuses on multiple pregnancy, operative obstetrics and obstetric imaging. He is interested in Quality and Safety and leads Quality Assurance in the Obstetric department in his hospital. He is active in research in these areas. Julian trained in medicine at Guy’s Hospital Medical School, London. His initial training in Obstetrics and Gynecology was at Guy’s Hospital, London and the Churchill and John Radcliffe Hospitals in Oxford, England. He then pursued research as a fellow at the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Oxford University. After training, Julian emigrated to America where he completed a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Eastern Virginia Medical Center and a fellowship in Maternal Fetal Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston. Faculty appointments before his current position include Maternal Fetal Medicine attending posts at the New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University in New York and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston.
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Professor of OBGYN, Vice Chair of Research, Director of Reproductive Genetics at Columbia University Medical Center
    Currently, Dr. Wapner is the Vice Chair of Research in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Columbia University Medical Center and Director of Reproductive Genetics. Dr. Wapner is an internationally known physician and researcher specializing in reproductive genetics. He pioneered the development of chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and multi-fetal reduction. He has authored or co-authored over 300 publications and he has been an active investigator in the area of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. He is either a principal or co-investigator for a number of NICHD sponsored multi-center studies. He serves as the center PI for the National Standards for Fetal Growth study and the NuMoM2B study at Columbia University in the Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network. Most recently, Dr. Wapner led a multicenter study evaluating the accuracy, efficacy, and clinical advantages of prenatal diagnosis using microarray analysis. In February of 2015, Dr. Wapner received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. He has had a significant role in the development of multidisciplinary research studies and clinical research centers throughout his career.
    • Pediatrics
    Dr. Pradeep Mally is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the New York University School of Medicine, Chief of the Division of Neonatology and is the director of the neonatal-perinatal fellowship program. Dr Mally has direct oversight over 2 Regional Neonatal Center’s at NYU Langone Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center in New York, with a combined 55 bed capacity. Dr. Mally is also the president of the New York Perinatal Society. Dr Mally graduated from Kasturba Medical College in India and further did his residency training in Pediatrics and a diploma in child health [Dch], from the same institute. He continued his training in USA, graduating from residency training in Pediatrics from Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn and fellowship training in neonatal-perinatal medicine from New York Medical College, Valhalla. Dr Mally has published extensively on topics related to late preterm infants, neonatal diabetes and sepsis, use of near Infra-Red Spectroscopy [NIRS] in clinical neonatology and blood transfusion and necrotizing enterocolitis. His research interest includes the use of near infra-red spectroscopy in clinical neonatology, use of newer mode of neonatal ventilation [NAVA] in clinical practice and acute and long term morbidities in late premature neonates.
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Head of Research, Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics adn Gynaecology at University of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital
    Dr. Kellie Murphy is a Maternal Fetal Medicine Specialist. She completed her obstetrical residency program at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City in 1995. She then completed a Maternal-Fetal Medicine fellowship program and a Master of Epidemiology at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and School of Public Health in New York. In July of 1998, she joined the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Toronto where she is currently an Associate Professor, based out of Mount Sinai Hospital. In addition, she holds a joint appointment with the Institute of Health Policy Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. Her primary research interests include prematurity, infectious disease, clinical trials and perinatal epidemiology. Her major professional pursuit has been the study of the effects of antenatal corticosteroid therapy. She designed and implemented the randomized controlled trial, “Multiple courses of Antenatal Corticosteroids for preterm birth Study (MACS)”, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). MACS, which is ongoing, is an international, multi-center, randomized, double-masked clinical trial designed to study the effects of single versus repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids in women at high risk of preterm birth. The primary outcome was a composite of death and neonatal morbidity. The study recruited 1,858 women through 80 centres from 20 countries around the world. To date, MACS is the largest trial of repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids. Unlike the prior trials, which suggested that multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids might be associated with respiratory benefit, MACS definitively demonstrated that repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids were of no benefit but were significantly associated with a decrease in birth weight, length and head circumference. Subsequent to completion of the primary trial, the team successfully followed this cohort of children, performing follow-up assessments on more than 80% of the cohort at 18 to 24 months and thereafter at five years of age. Dr. Murphy has been invited and continues to lecture at numerous hospitals and scientific conferences, both nationally and internationally, to speak on this important subject, and has been asked to write numerous commentaries, reviews and book chapters on antenatal corticosteroid therapy.
    • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    Professor of Pediatrics, Director of Clinical Research for Pediatric and Child Health Research Program, Director of Research for Division of Neonatology
    Professor of Pediatrics, Director of Clinical Research for Pediatric and Child Health Research Program, Director of Research...
    • Professor of Pediatrics at Oregon Health and Science University
    Dr. Cindy McEvoy is a Professor of Pediatrics at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland, Oregon. Dr. McEvoy’s translational research focus is to advance the understanding, prevention, and treatment of the perinatal origins of lifelong lung disease. Her area of expertise is the performance of neonatal and infant pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Dr. McEvoy is the Director of Clinical Research for the Pediatric and Child Health Research Program and the Director of Research for the Division of Neonatology at OHSU. She has conducted multiple randomized trials in pregnant women examining the impact of different regimes of antenatal steroids on newborn pulmonary function, and recently participated in a Cochrane individual and independent patient data meta-analysis on the topic of “Repeat Dosing with Antenatal Steroids During Pregnancy”. Dr. McEvoy is studying the ability of vitamin C supplementation during pregnancy to block the effects of in-utero smoke exposure on infant PFTs and long-term respiratory outcomes. Concurrently, she is focused on expanding the understanding of the pathogenesis and primary prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and the evolution of pulmonary function in late preterm infants. Dr. McEvoy has conducted trials examining the effect of postnatal dexamethasone on newborn PFTs, and she is evaluating the impact of continuous positive airway pressure on lung development in a premature non-human primate model as well as its impact on the pulmonary function of prematurely born infants. Dr. McEvoy has been funded by the National Institutes of Health since 2006 and has served on numerous committees and task forces for the National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute.
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    • Professor, Russell K Laros, Jr, MD Endowed Chair, Director of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Chief of Obstetrics at University of California at San Francisco
    Dr. Mari-Paule Thiet is a Professor and Russell K. Laros, Jr., MD Endowed Chair, in Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and the University of California, San Francisco. She is the Director of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine and Chief of Obstetrics at UCSF Medical Center. Dr. Thiet’s clinical focus is quality assurance and management of complicated pregnancies. Since 2009 she has been the Vice Chair of Patient Safety and Quality Assurance at UCSF, leading quality review and assessment of patient care findings to collaborate across silos to formulate solutions and action plans. Dr. Thiet has co-authored numerous peer-reviewed publications and chapters regarding complications in pregnancy, process of labor & delivery including time of delivery and length of labor. She is co-investigator on the PROCEED study: Effect of a patient-centered decision app on TOLAC: An RCT as well as site principal investigator for the PRESERVE-1 project: Prospective Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Evaluation of the Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Efficacy of Recombinant Antithrombin Versus Placebo in Preterm Preeclampsia. Previously she was co-investigator on The Infant Development and the Environment Study, a project is designed to examine the association between environmental exposures and identifiable birth anogenital birth defects. Since 2007 Dr. Thiet has been a board examiner for the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She has received many teaching awards from residents and medical students. She has also served in leadership positions in numerous committees and task forces for obstetrical organizations
    • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine
    • Neonatologist, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto
    Dr. Elizabeth Asztalos is a neonatologist at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, On, Canada. She is an associate professor of pediatrics and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Asztalos’ clinical and research focus has been the prevention of serious neonatal morbidity in the NICU setting and the associated neurodevelopmental outcomes in the high-risk preterm infant. She was the director of the Neonatal Follow-up Clinic at Sunnybrook from 1991-2008 and of the Neonatal Division from 2009-2011. She has played a major role in several large scale perinatal and neonatal trials and their respective follow-up phases. She was key investigator in the 2- and 5- year follow-up of the international trial, Multiple Courses of Antenatal Corticosteroids Trial (MACS Trial ).
    • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
    Dr. Sarah D. McDonald is a Clinician-Scientist, a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, where she has the pleasure of supervising visiting professors, postdocs, residents, physicians and students at all levels in research. She is supported by a Tier II Canada Research Chair. She has authored or co-authored over 90 peer reviewed publications in perinatal epidemiology, most relating to preterm birth.