Experts
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    • Breast Cancer Genetics
    • Cancer Genetics
    Director, Cancer Risk and Prevention Program, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
    Director, Cancer Risk and Prevention Program, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
    Nadine Tung, MD is the Director of the Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) which she established in 1997 to evaluate patients and families with hereditary cancer syndromes. She is also a breast medical oncologist and a member of the Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center as well as an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. She graduated from Princeton University in 1980 and Harvard Medical School in 1984. Dr. Tung's research focuses on hereditary causes of breast cancer as well as effective strategies for breast cancer prevention and treatment. Much of her research has focused on women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, studying the genetic and environmental factors that influence cancer development as well as the biology and prognosis of the breast cancers they develop. Through BCRF, she is overseeing a multi-center, national trial evaluating whether cisplatin is superior to standard chemotherapy for women with BRCA1/2 mutations and newly diagnosed breast cancer. Her research also focuses on identifying other inherited gene mutations that predispose to breast cancer. Other areas of Dr. Tung’s research include evaluating the prognosis and optimal treatment of triple negative breast cancer. Dr. Tung serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Clinical Oncology as well as the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Cancer Prevention Committee and Cancer Genetics Subcommittee.
    • Medical Oncology
    Associate Chief for Clinical Affairs, Medical Oncology, Stanford SOM
    Associate Chief for Clinical Affairs, Medical Oncology, Stanford SOM
    Dr. Blayney is a professor of Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine, and associate chief for clinical affairs in the Division of Medical Oncology of the Department of Medicine. His clinical interest is breast cancer, and his operational interests and research focuses on quality improvement in cancer care systems, improvement of the patient experience, and the optimum use of information technology to enhance these missions. Prior to Stanford, Dr. Blayney was Medical Director for Clinical Operations and professor at the University of Michigan’s Comprehensive Cancer Center for seven years. For the prior seventeen years, he was in community practice in southern California with the Wilshire Oncology Medical Group, Inc. He is past president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and was the founding editor-in-chief of the Journal of Oncology Practice. He serves on the board of directors of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and is a past member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Oncology Drugs Advisory Committee. He has authored over seventy peer reviewed publications, and co-edited one book. He advises commercial and not-for-profit entities in system design and improvement. Dr. Blayney received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering at Stanford, and his doctoral degree and house staff training at the University of California at San Diego School of Medicine. He was a clinical associate at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland and joined the faculty at Stanford in 2010. He lives with his wife Vicki at Stanford, and they have three grown daughters who live in Seattle, Nairobi, and Boston.
    • Anatomic Pathology
    • Clinical Pathology
    • Breast Cancer
    • Breast Pathology
    Chief of Breast Pathology, Weill Cornell Medicine
    Chief of Breast Pathology, Weill Cornell Medicine
    Dr. Sandra J. Shin is Chief of Breast Pathology and Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical College (NYPH-CUMC) in New York, N.Y. For the last 15 years as an attending pathologist, Dr. Shin has earned a national and international reputation as an expert breast pathologist and directs a busy breast pathology consultation service, one of the largest in the U.S., to which pathologists, clinicians and patients request second opinions. In addition, she has maintained a robust translational research program focused on breast disease. Dr. Shin has published extensively in her area of expertise (70+ peer reviewed scientific articles and numerous book chapters in textbooks such as World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Tumors of the Breast (4th edition), Breast Pathology (1st and 2nd editions), and Diagnostic Immunohistochemistry with Genomic and Theranostic Applications (1-4th editions). Also, Dr. Shin co-guest edited Surgical Pathology Clinics; Breast Pathology Issue (Elsevier, 2012) and most recently, is the editor of a new textbook entitled A Comprehensive Guide to Core Needle Biopsies of the Breast (Springer Publishing, 2016). She has served as a scientist grant reviewer for the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program for many years, was a participant at the World Health Organization (WHO) consensus editorial meeting in Lyon, France in 2012, and a member of the expert breast pathology committee for the National Cancer Institute (NCI)/ The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). She is a reviewer or on the editorial board for multiple medical journals, lectures frequently in the U.S. and abroad, as well as directs courses at major pathology society meetings. She is also the Pathology Residency Program Director and Breast Pathology Fellowship Director at the NYPH-WCMC. She is funded and co-PI of an R01 NIH/NCI grant investigating the pathophysiological role of CUL4A in mammary tumoriogenesis. Dr. Shin is a graduate of the Albany Medical College. She completed her training in anatomic and clinical pathology training at the NYPH-WCMC, completed a one year breast pathology fellowship with Dr. Paul Peter Rosen, a world renowned breast pathologist, and subsequently joined the faculty.
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    Dr. Melinda Telli is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Medical Oncology at Stanford with a clinical and research focus in breast cancer. Dr. Telli's primary research focus is the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of triple-negative and BRCA1/2 mutation-associated breast cancer. She is interested in the conduct of studies in early breast cancer that incorporate predictive biomarkers of response to therapy and their translation into clinical care. Other interests include cardiotoxicity of anti-cancer therapies and medical education.
    • General Surgery
    • Breast Cancer
    Co-Director, Avon Comprehensive Breast Evaluation Center, MGH
    Co-Director, Avon Comprehensive Breast Evaluation Center, MGH
    • Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital

    Dr. Hughes is a member of the Department of Surgical Oncology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and a graduate of Dartmouth College and Dartmouth Medical School. He trained at the Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh for general surgery, followed by a fellowship in surgical oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Hughes was formerly on the faculty of Tufts University, the University of California, Davis and Brown University. Dr. Hughes is actively involved in clinical care and research related to the genetics, screening, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and is actively involved in the development of Health Information Technology that improves quality while decreasing clinician workload. He co-authored the HL7, ANSI approved standard for transmitting family health history, and was the Principal Investigator for the Cooperative Group Trial (CALGB 9343) that showed radiation therapy had little benefit in women over age 70 with early breast cancer.

     

    He is the co-creator of 

    http://www.Ask2Me.Org

    Clinical Decision Support Tool that calculates risk for patients with cancer susceptibility gene mutations.

    • Medical Oncology
    • Assistant Professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins
    Dr. Roisin Connolly is an Assistant Professor of Oncology at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (SKCCC) at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD. Dr. Connolly completed her Internal Medicine training in Ireland and Australia. She commenced her Medical Oncology Fellowship training in Ireland on the Specialist Registrar in Medical Oncology Training Scheme. She subsequently undertook further training in the Medical Oncology Fellowship Program at the SKCCC at Johns Hopkins. She joined the Breast and Ovarian Cancer Program faculty in 2011 where her principal research activities consist of designing and conducting clinical trials that test investigational new drugs in the treatment of breast cancer. She has specific expertise in the use of epigenetic modifiers in breast cancer patients, and in developing both tissue and imaging-based biomarkers of response to breast cancer therapies. She is Principal Investigator for a number of multicenter trials in collaboration with the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) at the NCI, the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC), and the Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group (ECOG)-ACRIN. Dr. Connolly is Study Chair for a phase III ECOG-ACRIN study (E2112) investigating the HDAC inhibitor entinostat in combination with hormonal therapy in women with metastatic breast cancer. As a clinical investigator with a focus on translational drug development, her goal is to improve outcomes for patients with breast cancer in a research environment.
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    Instructor in Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Instructor in Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Dr. Daniel Stover is an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Stover’s clinical and research focus is resistance to therapy in breast cancer. Using computational approaches with large transcriptional datasets, he evaluates the role of individual cellular pathways in resistance to chemotherapy in breast cancer. In parallel with computational analyses, he pursues experimental approaches to study resistance using patient-derived models of breast cancer in the lab of Joan Brugge, PhD at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Stover actively collaborates on correlative studies from early phase clinical trials, including biomarker identification and testing, genomic/transcriptional analyses, and studies using patient-derived tissue. Dr. Stover is a cum laude graduate of Princeton University and received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University where he was named to AOA Honor Medical Society. Dr. Stover did his residency in internal medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and was selected to serve as the Hugh J. Morgan Chief Resident in Medicine. He completed his fellowship in Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Cancer Center program. Dr. Stover is the founding member of the Student-Resident section of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and currently serves on ASCO’s Membership Committee.
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    • Assistant Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Meghan Karuturi, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology in the Division of Cancer Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She finished her medical oncology fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center and her internal medicine residency at the University of Pennsylvania.
    • Internal Medicine
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    • Cancer Biology
    • Breast Cancer Genetics
    Assistant Professor of Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Assistant Professor of Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Dr. Silver an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His research focuses on predictive biomarkers of response to chemotherapy in triple negative breast cancer and on the discovery of novel therapeutic targets in cancer. He was involved in the analysis of two neoadjuvant trials of cisplatinum for triple negative breast cancer conducted at the Dana/Farber Harvard Cancer Center, and was instrumental in the development of telomeric allelic imbalance as a predictive biomarker of response to chemotherapy in triple negative breast cancer. This biomarker has been incorporated into the HRD biomarker, which is now undergoing prospective clinical testing in the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) trial, TBCRC 030. His research laboratory works on finding new therapeutic targets in cancer, largely by conducting genome-scale screens for new oncogenic drivers. Dr. Silver is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Harvard College in chemistry and physics, received his Ph.D. from MIT, where he performed his thesis research in the laboratory of Dr. David Baltimore. His MD is from UCSF, where he also completed an internal medicine residency. His then completed a medical oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber/Harvard program. He did postdoctoral fellowship research with Dr. David Livingston on BRCA1 at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Silver attends in in both the Breast Oncology and the Genetics and Prevention clinics at the Dana-Farber.
    • Radiology
    • Breast Cancer
    • Breast Density
    • Breast Cancer Screening
    • Breast Imaging
    • Breast Radiology
    Dr. Phoebe Freer, specializing in Breast Imaging, is an Associate Professor of Radiology at Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah Hospitals having recently relocated in 2015 after being on faculty at Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical School for 7 years prior. After earning her MD from Washington University School of Medicine in 2002, as an elected member to Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, she went to complete an internship at HealthOne Alliance, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital in Denver, Colorado. She then spent four years at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology-Washington University School of Medicine as a diagnostic radiology resident. Dr. Freer completed a fellowship in breast imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital in June 2008, and joined that faculty that July 2008 - June 2015. She is a member of the American College of Radiology Breast Cancer Screening Leadership Group. She is a leader in breast tomosynthesis, having trained over 2800 board-certified radiologists how to interpret breast tomosynthesis as well as authoring and co-authoring numerous publications, review articles, and chapters pertaining to breast cancer screening, tomosynthesis, and breast density. During her time at MGH, she served on the MGH Breast Imaging Fellowship Admission Committee, an interviewer for the Radiology Resident Admission Committee, an attending member of the Breast Tumor Board, and a Resident Mentor in the Department of Radiology.