Authors
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    • HIV-associated Cancers
    • Lymphoma
    Associate Chairman for Clinical Research, Dept of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center
    Associate Chairman for Clinical Research, Dept of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center
    • Professor of Medicine at Queen Elizabeth Hospital
    Dr. Joseph Sparano is Professor of Medicine and Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Associate Chairman for Clinical Research in the Department of Oncology at Montefiore Medical Center, and Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center, an NCI-designated cancer center. His research has focused on developmental therapeutic approaches for breast cancer, lymphoma, and HIV-associated cancers, and clinical application biomarkers in breast cancer. He has served as study chair for the Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment (TAILORx), the first clinical trial integrating a multiparameter gene expression assay in clinical decision making for adjuvant therapy with early stage ER-positive, HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer, which accounts for about one-half of all breast cancers in the United States. This is clinical scenario in which adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly recommended, but benefits only about 3-5% of patients. This National Cancer Institute sponsored trial completed accrual of approximately 10,000 patients in 2010, of which nearly 7000 patients with a mid-range Oncotype DX Recurrence Score of 11-25 were randomized to chemoendocrine therapy (the standard treatment arm) vs. endocrine therapy alone (the experimental arm). Patient with a high Recurrence Score > 25 were assigned to chemoendocrine therapy, whereas those with a low RS received endocrine therapy alone. Clinical outcomes for this latter group with a low RS are reported in this issue of the Journal, whereas results for patients with a mid-range and high RS are expected with more followup. Dr. Sparano is a graduate of the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education at the City College of New York, and New York Medical College. He completed his oncology training at Montefiore/Einstein, after which time he joined the faculty. His career has focused on cancer clinical trials, and he currently serves as Vice Chair of the ECOG-ACRIN Research Group and Vice Chair of the AIDS Malignancy Consortium.
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    Harrigan, Haw, Luck Families Chair in Cancer Research, Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center
    Harrigan, Haw, Luck Families Chair in Cancer Research, Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center
    Charles E. Geyer, Jr. is Professor of Medicine and the Harrigan, Haw, Luck Families Chair in Cancer Research at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, an NCI-designated Cancer Center. He serves as Associate Director of Clinical Research for the Massey Cancer Center with oversight responsibility for all cancer-related clinical research activities within the Center. Dr. Geyer has devoted most of his academic career on the design and conduct of multi-institutional, phase III clinical trials in breast cancer with a particular focus on the development of HER2 targeted therapies. He has served in several leadership positions for multi-institution research initiatives. These include vice-chair of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Breast Committee from 1999 until 2007, Associate Director of Medical Affairs from 2002 to 2006 and Director of Medical Affairs for NSABP from 2006 to 2011. In 2008, he was appointed as a founding Co-chair for the NCI Cancer Treatment Evaluation Program Breast Cancer Steering Committee and received a Director’s Award at the completion of his tenure in 2011. Dr. Geyer has co-authored over 60 peer-reviewed manuscripts including results of several landmark phase 3 trials conducted by the NSABP. He has also been active in leadership roles on collaborative global trials in breast cancer, having chaired or co-chaired Scientific Steering Committees on 4 phase III trials. He earned his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees from Texas Tech University.
    • Medical Oncology
    • Co-PI, NCORP Community Site at Aurora Health Center
    Currently, I am co-principal investigator for the Aurora Health Care NCORP Community Site and serve as the lead for cancer care delivery research (CCDR) at Aurora, an organization with a strong interest in cancer care redesign. I actively participate in CCDR activities of ECOG, The University of Rochester, and The Wake Forest Research Bases. I have one year experience as a protocol reviewer for the NCI Department of Cancer Prevention, where I developed expertise in cancer control interventions and end points. In addition, I have written protocols for ECOG, enrolled more than 500 patients in clinical trials, won silver and platinum awards for accrual to NCI studies, and served as the principal investigator at a successful former Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) for 10 years.
    • Medical Oncology
    • Breast Cancer
    Chief of the Breast Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
    Chief of the Breast Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
    Clifford A. Hudis, MD is Chief of the Breast Medicine Service and Attending Physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City where he is Vice President for Government Relations and Chief Advocacy Officer. He is a Professor of Medicine at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University, co-chair of the Breast Committee of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (formerly Cancer and Leukemia Group), Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, and a past President of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Through his career he has focused on the developing better treatments and prevention for breast cancer. He led the earliest pilot studies of dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy for high risk early stage breast cancer, which later became a standard option based on the results of randomized trials. His group has developed a range of novel therapeutics for the treatment of all stages of breast cancer. More recently he has focused on the interplay of inflammation, obesity, and cancer and his team described low grade, chronic white adipose inflammation within the breasts of most overweight and obese women which may lead to expression and activation of the aromatase enzyme. This could partially explain the increased rates of post-menopausal hormone-receptor positive breast cancers associated with obesity. While he served on ASCO’s Board of Directors, that organization made the unprecedented decision to create CancerLinQ to support the entire oncology community. This integrated system, planned for launch in 2016, will incorporate all forms of clinical care data and should allow clinicians and investigators to explore previously hidden associations and patterns in outcomes. With the increased stratification of historically common tumors into smaller and smaller subsets based on genomic and other biomarkers along with the rapid expansion in the number of agents to test, this tool may be critical to accelerating progress.