Moderators
    • Internal Medicine
    Internal medicine resident, Ohio State University
    Internal medicine resident, Ohio State University
    • PGY1 IM Physician-Scientist Track at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
    Francesca Cottini, MD, is a PGY1 in internal medicine in the physician-scientist track at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. I attended medical school at Universita' Vita- Salute San Raffaele in Milan. For my graduation thesis, I worked under the supervision of Dr. Paolo Ghia and Dr. Caligaris-Cappio on Monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis. I was co-author of two publications in Blood and Cytometry B Clin Cytometry. After graduating in 2009, I moved to Boston, thanks to a fellowship grant from Cariplo Foundation, and started working as a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Kenneth Anderson, a world-known expert of multiple myeloma and future president of the American Society of Hematology. Under his supervision, I published two first author publications and co-authored several other manuscripts. Specifically, one manuscript was published in 2014 in Nature Medicine, showing that YAP1, a transcriptional regulator of the Hippo pathway, is an essential factor in the control of apoptosis upon DNA damage in multiple myeloma and in other hematological malignancies. Re-activation of YAP1 by serine-threonin 4 (STK4) inhibition causes growth inhibition and apoptosis in hematological malignancies. These discoveries were highlighted in Nature Medicine, Cancer Discovery and Molecular and Cellular Oncology and endorsed in a US patent. Specific STK4 inhibitors are under development thanks to collaborative LLS grant and to a personal IMF fellowship. Another original work has just been published in Cancer Discovery, demonstrating that replicative stress, a condition associated with incomplete or aberrant DNA synthesis at the level of fork replications, is present in MM and causes together with oxidative stress ongoing DNA damage in a subset of patients with poor prognosis. Strategies coupling inhibition of DNA repair and induction of oxidative stress to trigger DNA damage represent a potent synthetic lethality approach in this cohort of patients with otherwise unfavorable outcomes. As other achievements, I am a 2014 TRTH trainee, being selected among the 20 top applicants from all over the world, and a past Daryl Elizabeth Layzer fellow and a current IMF fellow. I have won the ASH abstract achievement award, twice, and presented several times at the American Society of Hematology meetings and European Hematology Association meetings. I wrote 3 book chapters on MM, one that will be published in the next edition of Williams’ Hematology book, and have 3 US patents and several other publications as co-authors.
    • Hematology and Oncology
    Hematology & Oncology Fellow, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic
    Hematology & Oncology Fellow, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic
    • Leukemia Fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Dr. Nazha is currently engaged in a Hematology and Oncology fellowship at the Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic. Prior to his fellowship, he completed a Leukemia Fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center where he also served as an instructor in the Leukemia Department. Dr. Nazha’s curriculum vita demonstrates a remarkable body of scholarly work. He was awarded several prestigious teaching and research awards such as Future Leader in Hematology for Clinical Research Award, the James S. and Suzanne Cyrus Scholar Award Finalist, and the 2015 William E. Lower Research Award. He has authored and co-authored more than 30 peer-reviewed manuscripts and presented several research abstracts at national and international meetings. He is a member of a variety of oncology organizations and committees. His research interest is the development of novel and rationally designed clinical trials that utilize a large collection of genomic and computational data.