Authors
    • Critical Care Medicine
    • Pulmonary Disease
    Director, Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre
    Director, Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre
    • Honorary Professor in the Department of Health Services Research and Policy at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    In 1994, Kathy established the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) in the UK to facilitate improvements in the structure, process, outcomes and experiences of critical care for patients and for those who care for them. ICNARC undertakes a broad programme of clinical audit and research, both nationally and internationally. From 1994 to 2013, Kathy led and directed ICNARC and in 2004 was awarded the Humphry Davy Medal by the UK Royal College of Anaesthetists as a mark of distinction for her significant contribution to critical care. Following appointment of a Chief Executive in 2014, Kathy now acts as ICNARC’s Director of Scientific & Strategic Development and remains Director of its UK Clinical Research Collaboration Registered Clinical Trials Unit. Kathy is also an Honorary Professor in the Department of Health Services Research and Policy at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and in the Division of Research Strategy at University College London.
    Professor of Health Economics Methodology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
    Professor of Health Economics Methodology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
    • Department of Health Services Research and Policy at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    Richard holds a senior research fellowship from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), and leads a team undertaking methodological and applied work on health economic evaluation. His main research interests are in improving statistical methods for cost-effectiveness analysis, specifically addressing issues of external validity, non-compliance and confounding. Richard has extensive experience of designing and analysing cost-effectiveness studies based on RCTs and decision models. He has published evaluations across a diverse range of clinical areas including hepatitis C, stroke, elective and emergency surgery, paediatric intensive care and cardiovascular disease, and has a particular interest in critical care medicine. Richard has over 75 publications in peer-reviewed journals, and grants from the research councils and NIHR that total around £15 million. He is an Associate Editor for the US journal Medical Decision Making, and is on the College of experts for NIHR, ESRC and MRC.

    • Emergency Medicine
    • Surgical Critical Care
    Washington University; Emergency Medicine and Surgical / Trauma Critical Care
    Washington University; Emergency Medicine and Surgical / Trauma Critical Care
    • Professor of Surgery and Emergency Medicine at Washington university
    Tiffany Osborn, MD, MPH, is an Associate Professor with joint appointments working both in the Surgical / Trauma Intensive Care Unit and in the Emergency Department at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO. She is the ACEP representative to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign, is on the resuscitation guidelines writing committee and an author of the international guidelines on severe sepsis and septic shock management. She currently serves on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention national Sepsis Task Force. She worked on the National Quality Forum's Infectious Disease Committee, which vets potential CMS measures for possible national implementation. Dr. Osborn is a sepsis consultant for the Institute of Healthcare Improvement and worked with IHI's team to implement sepsis measures across multiple hospitals in New York. Dr. Osborn completed a Masters of Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine before begining work with the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) in London, England. She worked for ICNARC as the trial clinician for Protocolised Management in Sepsis (ProMISe) - a government funded RCT across 56 sites in England. Upon returning to the United States was awarded a scholarship to the Olin Business School's Leadership for Women program. Her publications center around: quality improvement, severe sepsis, biomarkers, resuscitation, trauma and critical care certification for emergency medicine physicians.
    Head Statistician, Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre
    Head Statistician, Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre

    Following his PhD in mathematical modelling of disease progression from the University of Cambridge, David joined the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) in 2002. David oversees the statistical work of the Centre, including both its National Audit Programme and the broad programme of research undertaken by the ICNARC Clinical Trials Unit. His main interests are risk prediction modelling, health technology assessment and evaluation of service delivery and organisation in critical care. David was Chief Investigator of the Fungal Infection Risk Evaluation (FIRE) and Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) research studies. David is a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and an Honorary Professor in the Department of Medical Statistics at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

    • Emergency Medicine
    Chair, Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN)
    Chair, Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN)
    • Professor of Emergency Medicine at University of Leicester
    Tim Coats trained in Emergency Medicine in Leeds and London, developing a particular interest in pre-hospital and trauma care, and completing an MD thesis on the incorporation of patterns of change in physiology in a predictive model of outcome following injury. Following appointed as a Senior Lecturer in London in 1996, he moved to the University of Leicester as Professor of Emergency Medicine in 2003. He is a past Chair of the College of Emergency Medicine Research Committee, past Chair of the NIHR National Specialist Group for Injuries and Emergencies, and Chairs the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN). He was lead clinician for the CRASH2 study and current research interests (www.le.ac.uk/emag) are changes in coagulation following injury, the role of antifibrinolytics following injury and non-invasive monitoring of the emergency patient (www.le.ac.uk/ddu).